Taking Care


The founding of the Muslim Students Association of the U.S. and Canada (now MSA National) - the precursor of ISNA - in 1963 - inspired Muslim physicians working in the U.S. to found their own organization within this new spreading national umbrella: the Muslim Medical Association. They were soon followed by engineers and scientists (i.e., The Association of Muslim Scientists and Engineers) and social scientists (i.e., Association of Muslim Social Scientists).

In due course, the physicians' committee blossomed into an independent body: the Islamic Medical Association of North America (IMANA).

At its 10th annual convention in 1977, IMANA adopted the Muslim physicians oath that had been presented at its 9th annual convention in Newark, which included the following supplication to God: "Give us the understanding that ours is a profession sacred that deals with Your most precious gifts of life and intellect."

IMANA and its members, who continue to acknowledge this precious gift, are also guided by "Whoever kills a human being, not in lieu of another human being nor because of mischief on Earth, it is as if he has killed all of humanity. And if he saves a human life, [it is as if] he has saved the life of all humanity" (5:35).

With this vision in mind, they established IMANA Medical Relief, which continues to send qualified volunteers to many lands and peoples stricken by both man-made and natural disasters.

To meet another pressing need, one commonly experienced by Muslims living as minorities confronted with vexing health and treatment questions that involve religious and medical ethics, in 1967 the group set up the IMANA Islamic Medical Ethics Committee, which both provides answers and informs non-Muslim physicians how to treat their Muslim patients in accordance with their beliefs. To fulfill this obligation, committee members also reach out to Islamic scholars to secure their advice. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Taking Care
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.