A Ciambra

By Lodge, Guy | Variety, May 21, 2017 | Go to article overview

A Ciambra


Lodge, Guy, Variety


DIRECTORS' FORTNIGHT

A Ciambra

Director: Jonas Carpignano

Cast: Pio Amato, Koudous Seihon, Iolanda Amato, Damiano Amato, Francesco Pio Amato, Patrizia Amato, Rocco Amato, Susanna Amato

Neo-realism isn't necessarily a genre built for star turns, but director Jonas Carpignano happened upon one anyway in his debut "Mediterranea": Then-preteen Pio Amato wasn't the lead in that accomplished, affecting refugee drama, but his spiky, wily turn as a Romani artful dodger in the Calabrian coastal town of Gioia Tauro was a bright, skittering firework in its margins. It comes as no surprise, then, that Carpignano has placed Pio center-stage for his similarly empathetic follow-up "A Ciambra," weaving the charismatic kid's tough coming-of-age narrative into a broader study of poverty and racial prejudice on the fringes of Italian society.

With the presence of Martin Scorsese as an executive producer, this polished semi-sequel to "Mediterranea" - which extends the narratives of certain characters from that film, but is otherwise a freestanding work - will doubtless boost Carpignano's already fast-rising profile on the festival and arthouse circuit. Creatively speaking, however, "A Ciambra" is something of a step sideways for the Italian-American filmmaker, consolidating his considerable formal and observational gifts while fumbling a bit as storytelling. Overlong and oddly over-plotted as it chronicles the unsurprising escalation of its young protagonist's life of crime, it counts on every ounce of Pio's darting energy to see audiences through its less electric passages.

As in "Mediterranea," Carpignano adopts a documentarian's gaze within a fictional framework. Pio, now 14, is effectively playing a version of himself, as are over a dozen members of the garrulous Amato family, whose loose, loud, overlapping conversations as a group have a chaotic, edgily affectionate energy that can't be scripted. Having now known the clan for several years - a short version of "A Ciambra" with the same title preceded Carpignano's feature debut - the helmer has clearly grown close enough to them to authentically work their foibles into fiction. Tim Curtin's fluid, on-the-fly camerawork - the spontaneity of which, thankfully, doesn't preclude beauty in its shadow play or occasional startling bursts of synthetic color - helps foster that remarkable intimacy, which doesn't always sit right with the more palpable contrivances in "A Ciambra's" narrative. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Ciambra
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.