Puglia Obstructs 'Europe's Keystone'

By Shoraka, Sarah | New Internationalist, June 2017 | Go to article overview

Puglia Obstructs 'Europe's Keystone'


Shoraka, Sarah, New Internationalist


Protests in southern Italy have delayed plans for construction of a vast natural-gas pipeline into Europe.

Residents of the Puglia region of southern Italy have long campaigned against Italy's section of the Trans Adriatic Pipeline or TAP (featured in Agenda, NI 496), a controversial megaproject that has been dubbed 'Europe's own Keystone XL'.

Campaigners say the $40-billion pipeline will lock European countries into fossil-fuel use for decades. Italians have other pressing concerns. They fear that their section of the 3,500-kilometre long pipeline - which stretches from Azerbaijan and enters Europe via the seaside town of San Foca - will cause significant damage to the landscape and coastline, and the loss of livelihoods.

The village of Melendugno has become a flashpoint. In March, workmen started to remove ancient olive trees in order to construct the pipeline, without permits having been issued for the work to begin. When hundreds gathered at the site to resist construction peacefully, the Italian government sent police to enforce the uprooting and removal of the trees.

In response, residents quickly organized public meetings that drew crowds of thousands. Protests started to make national headlines and international news. Over the course of the month, among sit-ins, barricades, last-minute court orders and appeals, close to 200 trees were removed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Puglia Obstructs 'Europe's Keystone'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.