Bursts of Insight; for Six Years Now, at My Blog Cafe Hayek, I've Featured a "Quotation of the Day." Each Is a Concentrated Nugget of Wisdom, Insight or Historical Perspective from Books, Articles and Blog Posts I've Read, Offered as Quick and Eloquent Sources of Deeper Understanding of Economics, Politics or History. Here Are Some of My Favorites. [Derived Headline]

By Boudreaux, Donald J. | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 6, 2017 | Go to article overview

Bursts of Insight; for Six Years Now, at My Blog Cafe Hayek, I've Featured a "Quotation of the Day." Each Is a Concentrated Nugget of Wisdom, Insight or Historical Perspective from Books, Articles and Blog Posts I've Read, Offered as Quick and Eloquent Sources of Deeper Understanding of Economics, Politics or History. Here Are Some of My Favorites. [Derived Headline]


Boudreaux, Donald J., Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


For six years now, at my blog Cafe Hayek, I've featured a "Quotation of the Day." Each is a concentrated nugget of wisdom, insight or historical perspective from books, articles and blog posts I've read, offered as quick and eloquent sources of deeper understanding of economics, politics or history. Here are some of my favorites.

"The fundamental problem is that we believe that health insurance is something that only should be received as a gift -- never obtained for oneself. Thus, we immediately assume that when a family does not have health insurance, they are to be pitied for not having received the gift, rather than being blamed for not having taken responsibility." -- Arnold Kling, "Learning Economics" (2004)

"Economics is haunted by more fallacies than any other study known to man. This is no accident. The inherent difficulties of the subject would be great enough in any case, but they are multiplied a thousandfold by a factor that is insignificant in, say, physics, mathematics or medicine -- the special pleading of selfish interests." -- Henry Hazlitt, "Economics In One Lesson" (1946)

"Thus politics, under democracy, resolves itself into impossible alternatives. Whatever the label on the parties, or the war cries issuing from the demagogues who lead them, the practical choice is between the plutocracy on the one side and a rabble of preposterous impossibilists on the other. ... It is a pity that this is so. For what democracy needs most of all is a party that will separate the good that is in it theoretically from the evils that beset it practically, and then try to erect that good into a workable system. What it needs beyond everything is a party of liberty. …

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Bursts of Insight; for Six Years Now, at My Blog Cafe Hayek, I've Featured a "Quotation of the Day." Each Is a Concentrated Nugget of Wisdom, Insight or Historical Perspective from Books, Articles and Blog Posts I've Read, Offered as Quick and Eloquent Sources of Deeper Understanding of Economics, Politics or History. Here Are Some of My Favorites. [Derived Headline]
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