George Miller Talks 'Mad Max' with NFTS Students

By Rosser, Michael | Screen International, October 13, 2015 | Go to article overview

George Miller Talks 'Mad Max' with NFTS Students


Rosser, Michael, Screen International


Australian director George Miller provided NFTS (National Film & TV School) students with a look into his filmmaking process following a screening of Mad Max: Fury Road at Warner Bros. offices in London.

The film, which has taken nearly $375m at the worldwide box office since its release in May, stars Tom Hardy in the role first made famous by Mel Gibson over three movies from 1979-85.

Describing his vision of the film, Miller said: "At its inception, it was a film that was going to be an extended chase. I wanted to see how much character, story and subtext the audience could pick up without stopping for exposition."

The filmmaker, who has also made family movies Babe: Pig in the City (1998) and Happy Feet (2006), recalled how he first wrote a treatment for the film in 1997, despite not wanting to return to the road warrior character.

"I never wanted to make a second Mad Max, let alone a fourth one," said Miller. "But they live like imaginary characters in your head. I keep pushing them away because I want to tell other stories.

"In an unguarded moment, I was flying across the Pacific overnight from Los Angeles to Sydney, and this story played out in my head."

That one-page treatment led Miller to work with graphic artist Brendan McCarthy and together they laid out the whole movies in storyboards, comprising 3,500 panels. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

George Miller Talks 'Mad Max' with NFTS Students
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.