8. Industrial Design: The Roles and Factors of Aesthetics, Modeling, Styling, Product Brand and Branding in Design/design Education

By Efer, Obasuyi Osa-Francis | Review of Artistic Education, January 1, 2017 | Go to article overview

8. Industrial Design: The Roles and Factors of Aesthetics, Modeling, Styling, Product Brand and Branding in Design/design Education


Efer, Obasuyi Osa-Francis, Review of Artistic Education


1.Introduction

The industrial design enterprise and profession has come a long way since the second half of the 19th century. The pioneers of the profession never envisaged that the discipline will single handedly help change the face of our world, the nature, context and characterization of the material culture and consequently the man-made environment, for good. According to Lucie-Smith (2001) who says that "the phenomenology of change of civilization from its early subsistence agrarian economy to a new world order was brought about by the advent of New Technologies / Inventions for industrialization in the Age of the industrial Revolution. That was brought about by an adaptation to the serial nature of the factory Assembly lines and means of production of goods, mass produced solely for commercial purposes. This new reality of mass production techniques totally helped to eradicate the time honoured Traditional, of the unitary systems of custom-made (customized, hand-crafted),/Artisan methods of production of local goods which were made to order, either for patrons or wealthy upper class clients in society. This Aspect of production of handcrafted masterpieces by master craftsmen, seemed to have been lost forever to the Age and Advent of the Machine (Assembly line) and New means of Mass production/manufacture.

Loewy (1980) in his submission, observed that, "the New Factors of production together with the New expertise and competencies in modern techniques and Technology that emerged therefrom" was responsible for the changes so stated above. Thereby giving rise to new entrepreneural breakthroughs in skills and service delivery. The Dawn of Advertising and New means of communication suddenly changed the whole dynamics of the economic growth of the developed Nations of the world. This being the case, the numerous goods and services made available by these factories, needed to be sold and distributed. Competition became stiff amongst manufacturers. The demand for consumer goods in the late 1800's and early 1920's were at its peak. This demand was also dictated by new consumer benchmarks of not just only functional goods but that they should also be Aesthetically appealing, to warrant purchase. So saw the concept of quality, Beauty and Aesthetics (of the Product Brand / Branding) suddenly became the yardstick that dramatically changed the whole scenario and Dynamics of the methods of production. With the resultative increase in volume of goods produced, so also saw an increase in demand for consumer goods and an increase in consumer preferences for quality, aesthetics and performance (function) of such goods. This became the primary concern of most of the products manufacturers. So strong was the debate, urgency and need for experts whose job it was to change and provide these missing components of Aesthetics, Beauty and Style in the new products. This search for quality, beauty and Aesthetics also brought about the dawn of the Age of the Industrial Designers (who could also be called Aestheticians in their own right).

2.New Roles and Dialogue of the factors of Quality and Aestethetics in Product Branding

Along that same Dialogue, the concept of quality before now tends to allude to and align with the principles and belief of the 3Fs, that "FORM" "FOLLOWS" "FUNCTION" or that "FORM BEGAT FORM". In the era of the Industrial Revolution it was believed that if a product was functional therefore it must be a good product. This template later proved to be so faulty, that if a product functions doesn't necessarily mean it must be good. According to Papanek (2009) who believes that consumers are first and foremost, human beings, with a body, soul and spirit and therefore would always be drawn to or attracted by products/services that bears or carries the attributes that is in tune with their cultural, socio-economic preferences. Even sometimes seeking products that qualifies or satisfies their Ego or Status symbol in society. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

8. Industrial Design: The Roles and Factors of Aesthetics, Modeling, Styling, Product Brand and Branding in Design/design Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.