Carol Kane 1982, “Taxi”

By Friedlander, Whitney | Variety, June 5, 2017 | Go to article overview

Carol Kane 1982, “Taxi”


Friedlander, Whitney, Variety


GIVEN HER THEATER TRAINING, it shouldn't be a surprise that Carol Kane seemed completely cool when she took the stage in 1982 to accept the Emmy for lead actress in a comedy for her work in ABC's "Taxi" (she'd win the supporting actress in a comedy trophy the next year, even though the show had been cancelled by then). In a period-appropriate puffy-sleeved dress that matched her trademark voluminous blonde curls, Kane dutifully thanked her "incredibly generous" co-stars as well as series creator Jim Brooks, her parents and other luminaries before politely exiting the stage in a timely manner. Looking back on it, Kane - this year a contender in the supporting actress in a comedy category for Netflix's "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" - tells Variety that the poise was an act. WHITNEY FRIEDLANDER

Were you feeling as confident as you looked when you accepted your award?

Part of that togetherness was just fear. I'd never really done comedy before that, except for "The World's Greatest Lover," a movie I did with Gene Wilder. I'd always been a dramatic actress. I think I was still in that vein.

I think I was completely shocked to win, which I think you can also sort of see. I was also lucky because my oldest friend in the world, Doug Chapin, who I'd went to high school with - he used to be an actor and then became a manager and produced "When a Stranger Calls," which I was in, and produced "What's Love Got to Do With It" - was with me. Somebody I'd known since I was 13 years old [was there], so that was an anchoring factor.

I just felt admiration for the quality of the writing; and I mean the writers [of "Taxi"]. …

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