Haskell Wexler, Oscar-Winning Cinematographer, Dies Aged 93

By Kay, Jeremy | Screen International, December 27, 2015 | Go to article overview

Haskell Wexler, Oscar-Winning Cinematographer, Dies Aged 93


Kay, Jeremy, Screen International


Haskell Wexler was nominated five times for the Academy Award and won twice for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? in 1967 and Bound For Glory ten years later.

His other three nominations came for One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest (shared with Bill Butler) in 1975, Matewan in 1987 and most recently Blaze in 1990.

Wexler was born in Chicago and joined the Merchant Marines before returning home to make documentaries and educational films. He remained politically aware after moving to California and directed Medium Cool in 1969, about the 1968 Democratic National convention.

His son JeffWexler posted the following notice on his website: "It is with great sadness that I have to report that my father, Haskell Wexler, has died. Pop died peacefully in his sleep, Sunday, December 27th, 2015.

"Accepting the Academy Award in 1967, Pop said: 'I hope we can use our art for peace and for love.' An amazing life has ended but his lifelong commitment to fight the good fight, for peace, for all humanity, will carry on."

Steven Poster, president of the International Cinematographers Guild, issued the following statement on Monday:

"On behalf of the International Cinematographers Guild and me, we are deeply saddened by the death of one of our most esteemed board members, Haskell Wexler. Haskell's cinematography has always been an inspiration to so many of us not only in the Guild, but in the entire industry. …

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