'Titanic' Composer James Horner Dies in Plane Crash

By Rosser, Michael | Screen International, June 23, 2015 | Go to article overview

'Titanic' Composer James Horner Dies in Plane Crash


Rosser, Michael, Screen International


James Horner, the Oscar-winning composer who wrote the score for Titanic, has died in a plane crash. He was 61.

He is reported to have been alone aboard a two-seater private plane, which crashed north of Santa Barbara in California around 9.30am on Monday (June 22).

The crash caused a brush fire that had to be put out by firefighters, according to local fire authorities.

His personal assistant, Sylvia Patrycja, wrote on Facebook: "We have lost an amazing person with a huge heart, and unbelievable talent. He died doing what he loved. Thank you for all your support and love and see you down the road."

Horner was nominated for several Oscars during his career for best original scores and original songs.

These ranged from the bombastic score to James Cameron's Aliens to the sweet original song Somewhere Out There from animation An American Tail - both in 1987.

Other nominations came for Mel Gibson's Braveheart and Ron Howard's Apollo 13, both in 1996.

But his two wins, in 1998, were for perhaps his most famous work on Titanic. The soundtrack, including Celine Dion song My Heart Will Go On, which Horner wrote with Will Jennings, became one of the biggest-selling film score album of all time, selling around 30 million units.

Upcoming films scored by Horner include Antoine Fuqua boxing movie Southpaw, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, and Chilean miners drama The 33, starring Antonio Banderas.

On June 23 the Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency issued the following statement: "It is with the deepest regret and sorrow that we mourn the tragic passing of our dear colleague, long-time client and great friend, composer James Horner. …

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