Benefactors and Beneficiaries? Disability and Care to Others

By Shandra, Carrie L.; Penner, Anna | Journal of Marriage and Family, August 2017 | Go to article overview

Benefactors and Beneficiaries? Disability and Care to Others


Shandra, Carrie L., Penner, Anna, Journal of Marriage and Family


Most literature on care work and disability in the United States focuses on people with disabilities as beneficiaries of care, as the presence of a functional limitation often requires inputs to activities that help increase functioning, facilitate activities of daily living, and manage associated health conditions (Iezzoni & O'Day, 2006). Furthermore, evidence suggests that the majority of the care provided to people with disabilities who live in the community is delivered informally by family members (Houser, Gibson, & Redfoot, 2010). Understanding patterns of caregiving for people with disabilities is crucial for assessing how to support individuals with limiting conditions as well as the family members who often provide for them.

However, a growing literature documents how people with disabilities are also benefactors of care in multiple capacities. There are millions of parents with disabilities in the United States who live with minor children (McNeil, 1993) and engage in similar child care activities similar to those of parents without disabilities (Olkin, Abrams, Preston, & Kirschbaum, 2006). Likewise, an estimated 38% of informal caregivers to dependent adults have some sort of functional limitation (Thorpe, Thorpe, Schulz, Van Houtven, & Schleiden, 2015). Recently, time use studies indicate that persons with work disabilities or functional limitations (Anand & Ben-Shalom, 2014) and persons who receive Social Security Disability Insurance (Shandra, 2016) invest nonnegligible amounts of daily time in care to others. Despite this evidence, much of the existing literature on care work focuses on care to people with disabilities (for reviews, see Drew, 2009; England, 2005), typically neglecting to acknowledge that people with disabilities are often active contributors to care relationships. Exceptions to this approach can be found in feminist and disability studies critiques that problematize the dichotomy between care and dependency and recognize the interdependency and reciprocity inherent in many caring relationships (Barry, 1995; Feder & Kittay, 2002; Thomas, 2007; Walmsley, 1993).

This study adds to our understanding of care work by shifting the traditional focus on people with disabilities as beneficiaries of care to examine the extent to which they serve as benefactors of care. We seek to understand the multiplicity of contexts in which care work may be performed; therefore, our analyses consider care to children, to adult householders, to nonhouseholders, and support care (housework). This broad approach to understanding the "care continuum" (Folbre & Yoon, 2008, p. 32; Walmsley, 1993) across household structures is especially important when considering the population of working-aged people with disabilities because nearly a quarter live alone (Altman & Blackwell, 2014) and are less likely than those without disabilities to be married or to live with household children (Clarke & McKay, 2014). Our analysis of data from the 2008-2015 American Time Use Survey (ATUS; Hofferth, Flood, & Sobek, 2015) considers that people with disabilities may allocate care to different recipients than people without disabilities and extends existing literature by examining variation across several types of disability-including sensory limitations, mental or cognitive limitations, physical limitations, and multiple limitations. Results indicate that individuals with disabilities make substantial investments in care to others, investments that should be more fully recognized in studies of caregiving.

Literature Review

Conceptualizing Care and Time Spent Caring

Contemporary frameworks of what it means to provide care draw from a variety of theoretical perspectives that differ in their focus on the site of production, caregiver motivation, and types of beneficiaries (Duffy, Albeda, & Hammond, 2013; Folbre, 2006; for a review, see England, 2005). However, they are similar in acknowledging that care work encompasses an array of activities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Benefactors and Beneficiaries? Disability and Care to Others
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.