Crepes Offer Blank Canvas for Flavors and Textures

By For, Audrey Alfaro | The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), July 12, 2017 | Go to article overview

Crepes Offer Blank Canvas for Flavors and Textures


For, Audrey Alfaro, The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA)


Dorothy Dean presents

The thought of making crepes can be intimidating. But in actuality, they're easier to make than pancakes.

Just think of them as thin pancakes. Thin pancakes that are simpler to prepare.

Crepes consist of five ingredients commonly found in your kitchen. Throw them all in your blender, press pulse and the batter is done. No multiple bowls or sifting required. Though, the batter does have to rest for an hour, but it can also be made two days in advance.

The one thing that can be tricky is spreading the batter thin and evenly enough in the pan. This is done by holding the handle of the pan and moving your wrist in a circular motion, swirling the batter around the surface of the pan until it's well coated. This wrist-batter dance can take some getting used to. The first few are always oddly shaped, and I write them off as taste testers. But once you get it down, you'll be on a roll. Or should I say, swirl?

Crepes are so versatile you can have them for breakfast, lunch or dinner. The possibilities for fillings are endless.

They're basically a blank canvas for flavors and textures.

For breakfast, I like to add spinach into the batter before blending it and fill them with ham, Swiss cheese and scrambled eggs. For dinner, these are excellent stuffed and baked. My favorite is chicken with ricotta, mushrooms and spinach, topped with bechamel sauce. And these are awesome for a dessert bar. By adding sugar to the batter - along with either cinnamon, cocoa powder or lemon zest - you can transform these crepes into heavenly vessels for an array of toppings.

Sweet or savory, crepes open up a world of deliciousness. …

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