Tips for Taking Better Photos of Your Garden and Wildlife

By Dutton, Melissa Kossler | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), July 16, 2017 | Go to article overview

Tips for Taking Better Photos of Your Garden and Wildlife


Dutton, Melissa Kossler, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


So the garden you planted or enjoy each day is flowering. Birds and animals are busy in your yard or neighborhood. And you'd love to capture all this natural beauty in photos.

It's so easy these days to pull out a phone and take pictures of anything anytime, but a little time and thought can produce better garden and wildlife photos.

"There's a big difference between that for-the-record shot that preserves a memory and getting a really nice image," says Brenda Tharp, author of the new book "Expressive Nature Photography."

Pause before pressing the shutter, she says, and consider: Is the light right? Can you give your photo a unique point of view by shooting from different angles and levels, moving to the side, crouching or standing on something?

Try to identify what it is about the subject matter that "stopped you in your tracks," she says. "It's really about narrowing down your purpose in making that picture."

SOME TIPS FROM THARP AND OTHER NATURE PHOTOGRAPHERS

THE RULE OF THIRDS

Resist the temptation to center the subject, suggests Rob Simpson, an instructor in nature photography at Lord Fairfax College in Middletown, Va. Think of your photo as a tic-tac-toe board, and place the subject in one of the off-center thirds of the space. "It's going to make the photo more pleasing to the eye," he said. "It gives it balance."

TEXTURE IS TERRIFIC

One of the most exciting things about photographing flowers and leaves is capturing something that passers-by won't see - their textures up-close, says Patty Hankins, a floral photographer in Bethesda, Md., who sells her work and offers photography tips at beautifulflowerpictures.com. A camera's "macro" setting lets you take an extreme close-up and keep it in focus. "It shows you all these incredible things that people who aren't stopping to look won't see," she says. "It's about filling the frame with small details."

STAYING STILL

When using the macro setting, keep the camera as still as possible, Hankins says. "If you're taking a picture of the Grand Canyon and your hand shakes a little, people aren't likely to notice," she said. "But if you're taking a photo of the center of a sunflower, they're much more likely to see it. …

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