Speech Problems May Be Indicator of Mental Decline

By Marchione, Marilynn | The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV), July 18, 2017 | Go to article overview

Speech Problems May Be Indicator of Mental Decline


Marchione, Marilynn, The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV)


Your speech may, um, help reveal if youre, uh, developing thinking problems. More pauses, filler words and other verbal changes might be an early sign of mental decline, which can lead to Alzheimers disease, a study suggests. Researchers had people describe a picture they were shown in taped sessions two years apart. Those with early stage mild cognitive impairment slid much faster on certain verbal skills than those who didnt develop thinking problems.

What weve discovered here is there are aspects of language that are affected earlier than we thought, before or at the same time that memory problems emerge, said one study leader, Sterling Johnson of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

This was the largest study ever done of speech analysis for this purpose, and if more testing confirms its value, it might offer a simple, cheap way to help screen people for very early signs of mental decline.

Dont panic: Lots of people say um and have trouble quickly recalling names as they age, and that doesnt mean trouble is on the way.

In normal aging, its something that may come back to you later, and its not going to disrupt the whole conversation, another study leader, Kimberly Mueller, explained. The difference here is, it is more frequent in a short period, interferes with communication and gets worse over time.

The study was discussed Monday at the Alzheimers Association International Conference in London.

About 47 million people worldwide have dementia, and Alzheimers is the most common type. In the U.S., about 5.5 million people have the disease. Current drugs cant slow or reverse it, just ease symptoms. Doctors think treatment might need to start sooner to do any good, so theres a push to find early signs.

Mild cognitive impairment causes changes that are noticeable to the person or others, but not enough to interfere with daily life. It doesnt mean these folks will develop Alzheimers, but many do 15 to 20 percent per year.

To see if speech analysis can find early signs, researchers first did the picture-description test on 400 people without cognitive problems and saw no change over time in verbal skills. Next, they tested 264 participants in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimers Prevention, a long-running study of people in their 50s and 60s, most of whom have a parent with Alzheimers and might be at higher risk for the disease themselves. Of those, 64 already had signs of early decline or developed it over the next two years, according to other neurological tests they took.

In the second round of tests, they declined faster on content (ideas they expressed) and fluency (the flow of speech and how many pauses and filler words they used. …

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