Inherit the Mountain: Religion and the Rise of American Environmentalism/The Environment in American History: Nature and the Formation of the United States

By Rowthorn, Anne | Anglican and Episcopal History, June 2017 | Go to article overview

Inherit the Mountain: Religion and the Rise of American Environmentalism/The Environment in American History: Nature and the Formation of the United States


Rowthorn, Anne, Anglican and Episcopal History


Inherit the Mountain: Religion and the Rise of American Environmentalism. By Mark R. Stoll. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015, Pp. xi, 406. $39.95); and The Environment in American History: Nature and the Formation of the United States. By Jeff Crane. (New York and London: Roudedge, 2015, Pp. xi, 439. $54.95, paper.)

Here are two timely and exhaustively researched new books that would serve as comprehensive text books in university environmental studies programs. The Environment in American History is a history of the United States seen from the point of view of the environment. It opens with a long and comprehensive look at Native American life in North America prior to European settlement; how Native people lived off the land and adapted it to their needs for clothing, shelter and food and in doing so the author corrects several popular misconceptions.

The book documents the rise of agriculture, railroads and the opening of the West, the Civil War, the evolution of national parks, forestry, the establishment of conservation organizations such as the Sierra Club and the Wilderness Society. It describes environmental legislation and the political pressure that brought it about, outlining the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the Wilderness Act. The well-known greats who influenced environmental history are introduced, John Muir and Rachel Carson, and lesser-known like Alice Hamilton, an urban pioneer who studied the impacts of heavy metals and chemicals on workers in Chicago in the early 1900s, and environmental activist, Dave Foreman, a founder of EarthFirst! Difficult topics such as the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and their impact on the environment are covered, as are DDT and other hazardous pesticides. The book is amply illustrated. Many extended quotations from original sources enhance the text, as do timelines at the head of each chapter. Study questions are included along with and suggestions for further reading.

Inherit the Mountain looks at the rise of environmentalism from the perspective of religious denominations. Whereas The Environment in American History begins with Native American life in the New World, Inherit the Mountain opens in the areas around Northampton, Massachusetts, location of rich religious and philosophical ferment and the gathering place of leading Calvinist clergy as Eleazer Mather, Solomon Stoddard, and Jonathan Edwards. Here unfold eighteenth and nineteenth century doctrines of God, humanity, art and the spirituality of nature. Stoll sets the artist, Thomas Cole, the founder of the Hudson River School, within this tradition of romantic portrayal of the American landscape. The book includes handsome color illustrations of Cole's major works and those of other landscape artists. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Inherit the Mountain: Religion and the Rise of American Environmentalism/The Environment in American History: Nature and the Formation of the United States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.