Bobby Flay Cooks Up Plan to Sell Manhattan Duplex

By David, Mark | Variety, July 11, 2017 | Go to article overview

Bobby Flay Cooks Up Plan to Sell Manhattan Duplex


David, Mark, Variety


Celebrity chef and international restaurateur Bobby Flay, host and exec producer of reality TV cooking competition "Beat Bobby Flay," has had a tough time selling off a luxury duplex condo in New York City's Chelsea neighborhood. But rather than going the customary route of a price reduction to entice potential buyers, he raised the asking price from $7 million to $7.25 million. The duplex condo, in the same building where Katie Holmes holed up after she split from Tom Cruise, is a combination of two units, the first acquired in September 2000 for $815,000, and the second in early 2005 for $1.5 million. Together, they measure in at a bit more than 3,200 square feet with three bedrooms and three bathrooms.

The lower level offers a foyer with custom switchback staircase, a combination living and dining room with a full wall of floor-to-ceiling bookcases and an openplan kitchen cleverly designed to keep work areas out of view of the living and dining area. There's an oversize walk-in pantry tucked up under the stairs, and just off the kitchen, behind a wall of steeltrimmed casement windows, an office is lined along three walls with built-in desks and bookshelves. There's one bedroom and a bathroom downstairs; upstairs, along with a 27-foot-long family/media room with zinc-topped built-in bar, there's another guest bedroom and bathroom plus a master suite with two walk-in closets and an en suite marble bathroom.

Property records indicate Flay continues to own a one-bedroom and one-bathroom, Hudson River-view apartment in a Trumpbranded building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan purchased in 2008 for $1.45 million, as well as a nearly three-acre estate secreted down a private lane in a thickly wooded area of East Hampton, N.Y., picked up over the summer of 2009 for just about $1.5 million.

David Arquette Sells Windsor Square Manse

David Arquette has sold his home in L.A.'s historic and historically well-to-do Windsor Square neighborhood for just a tad below the last asking price of $8.45 million, but still a good bit over the $7.15 million he and his "Access Hollywood Live" correspondent wife, Christina Arquette, née McLarty, paid for the property in August 2014. The carefully restored and updated Tudormeets-English Arts and Crafts-style residence, a registered city landmark known as O'Melveny House, measures in at more than 9,700 square feet with seven bedrooms and six full and two half bathrooms.

Designed by Sumner Hunt of the esteemed architecture firm Hunt, Eager and Burns, the grand residence was originally built in 1908 at the corner of New Hampshire Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard by Henry O'Melveny, a prominent attorney and avid outdoorsman who in 1930 had the entire house picked up and moved almost two miles to its present location.

Interior spaces retain authentic and re-created architectural details and include a foyer wrapped in mahogany paneling, an enormous formal living room with a fireplace, a mahogany-paneled dining room with a fireplace and a library lined with built-in bookshelves. Less formal family quarters include an up-to-date eat-in kitchen and a paneled den with a fireplace and a stained glass window that depicts a leafy tree. The spacious master suite offers a fireplace, two walk-in closets and a bathroom fitted with an old-fashioned clawfoot tub and a newfangled steam shower. There's also a wine cellar in the basement and a gigantic third-floor attic space with sloped ceilings and a bar area. A deep porch along the back of the house overlooks a lawn ringed by mature trees, a meditation pond, a swimming pool, a spa and a double-sided outdoor fireplace set into a sunny terrace.

Critical Content's Tom Forman Lists L.A. Digs

Legally embattled producer Tom Forman, former CEO of Relativity TV and current CEO of Critical Content, has hoisted his East Coast-style mini-compound in the Los Feliz area of Los Angeles up for sale with an asking price just over $3.8 million. …

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