China Is Threatening US Military Aircraft. Here's How Trump Should Respond

By Rogan, Tom | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, July 24, 2017 | Go to article overview

China Is Threatening US Military Aircraft. Here's How Trump Should Respond


Rogan, Tom, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


As Lucas Tomlinson reports at Fox News, this weekend, two J-10 Chinese Air Force jets came close to downing a U.S. Navy EP-3 reconnaissance plane this weekend.

Flying erratically, they nearly crashed into the 24-person crewed U.S. aircraft.

Let's be clear, this is a warning shot from the Chinese military. The Chinese remember full well what happened in April 2001, when a U.S. EP-3 was forced to land on Chinese-held Hainan island after a Chinese jet crashed into it. That incident sparked a major diplomatic crisis.

And China knows that we know that this history is their thought process.

Correspondingly, it's abundantly clear that China has decided to pushback against growing U.S. pressure in the South and East China Seas. President Trump is deploying additional U.S. forces to send China a message: fail to pressure North Korea to abandon its ballistic missile program, and we will increase the U.S. Military's forward deployed presence in the region (China hates the presence of the U.S. Military for many reasons).

This weekend's incident is China's response.

In order to protect our personnel, and our diplomatic agenda, we must counter this new Chinese escalation.

As a first step, the U.S. should attach U.S. Navy and Air Force fighter jets as reconnaissance flight escorts. In the military, such escorts are known as HAVCAPs (High Asset Value Combat Air Patrols) and entail the protection of vulnerable, VIP, or unarmed military aircraft such as the EP-3. Sending up escorts would entail a change to the military's deployment posture, but it is necessary. …

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