J.K. Rowling, Moral Crusader, Still Won't Delete Her Lies about Donald Trump

By Jashinsky, Emily | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, July 31, 2017 | Go to article overview

J.K. Rowling, Moral Crusader, Still Won't Delete Her Lies about Donald Trump


Jashinsky, Emily, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling regularly uses her Twitter account as a megaphone for promoting progressive causes, an activity that involves a fair amount of self-satisfied moralizing on her part. The writer's tweets last week shaming President Trump for allegedly ignoring the outstretched hand of a disabled boy smacked of that same inflated sense of superiority.

Unfortunately for Rowling, however, the video on which she based her criticism was misleading. The full, unedited footage shows Trump heading directly to the wheelchair-bound boy upon entering the room, spending nearly ten seconds greeting him.

"Ummm," the child's mom wrote on Facebook, "if someone can please get a message to JK Rowling. Trump didn't snub my son & Monty wasn't even trying to shake his hand (1. He's 3 and hand shaking is not his thing. 2. He was showing off his newly acquired secret service patch). Thanks."

People of all political philosophies inadvertently propagate misinformation at times. It's often an honest mistake, made much easier by the rapid pace of social media. Though the damage is often irreversible, it's a simple enough matter to delete the false information and issue a retraction or apology. In fact, in this particular case, the person who uploaded the original video, along with Keith Olbermann and Chelsea Clinton who also chimed in, deleted the offending posts.

Rowling, Twitter's great champion of decency, has not. …

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