Saving Neoliberalism in the Age of Trump

Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, July 21, 2017 | Go to article overview

Saving Neoliberalism in the Age of Trump


Socialists have created quite an alliance of most everyone across the political spectrum in recent broadsides against "neoliberalism." The socialist Left's problem with Hillary Clinton and the Democratic Party is that they are "neoliberals" - that is, that they believe in at least some version of markets and capitalism and do not actively pursue government takeover of all industry.

New York Magazine's Jonathan Chait, one of those center-left writers who has been derided as a neoliberal by the socialist-left, wrote of this phenomenon and his perception of its uselessness:

In the international context, "neoliberal" means capitalist, as distinguished from socialist. That meaning has rarely had much application in American politics, because liberals and conservatives both believe (to starkly differing degrees) in capitalism. If "neoliberal" simply describes a belief in some role for market forces, then it is literally true that liberals and conservatives are both "neoliberal."

It is strange, though, to apply a single term to opposing combatants in America's increasingly bitter partisan struggle.

Chait is right, and it's likely exhausting to fend off these semi-internecine attacks on the Left. But his critics have a point, and in the Trump era, it's useful to think of the neoliberal frame in this broad way. The socialist left and their champions believe in moving American politics so far left that Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, and others are capitalist sellouts.

President Barack Obama didn't break up or take over the big banks in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. Hillary Clinton wouldn't nationalize the health insurance industry. To the socialist left, Democrats and Republicans are indeed closer to each other than to socialism. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Saving Neoliberalism in the Age of Trump
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.