Editorial Exchange: Canada Can't Blink on Free Trade

The Canadian Press, August 18, 2017 | Go to article overview

Editorial Exchange: Canada Can't Blink on Free Trade


Editorial Exchange: Canada can't blink on Free Trade

--

An editorial from the Amherst News, published Aug. 18:

As talks started this week to "modernize" the 23-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement between Canada, the United States and Mexico, the Atlantic Provinces Economic Council is warning that this region has a lot at stake.

It's something regional governments and businesses know full well. Atlantic Canada exported $19 billion of goods to the U.S. last year, about 75 per cent of its merchandise. Close to 100,000 jobs in this region depend on exports to the U.S., about eight per cent of total employment. The Atlantic provinces send much less to Mexico -- about $102 million worth of goods in 2016.

Exports of seafood, agricultural products, lumber, natural gas and oil are important economic generators for Atlantic Canada.

So, any Canadian setbacks at the negotiating table will be deeply felt here.

But there's a sense that Canadian negotiators might not be as concerned with Atlantic regional issues as they should be.

The United States is preoccupied with auto exports, B.C. softwood lumber and western oil, so understandably it's those areas are dominating the attention of Canada's NAFTA team. Let's hope they don't forget about the rest of us.

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland has clearly stated that talks must ensure a more equitable spread of economic benefits, or else Canadians will lose faith in free trade and globalization.

While many involved with NAFTA are preoccupied with exports, imports, deficits and surpluses -- and they are, without doubt, important -- Freeland argues that the people with the most at risk are ordinary Canadians. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Editorial Exchange: Canada Can't Blink on Free Trade
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.