Editorial Exchange: Who Passed and Who Failed the Trump Test This Week

The Canadian Press, August 18, 2017 | Go to article overview

Editorial Exchange: Who Passed and Who Failed the Trump Test This Week


Editorial Exchange: Who passed and who failed the Trump test this week

--

An editorial from the Toronto Star, published Aug. 17:

This is the week that clarified, suddenly and sharply, what Donald Trump's presidency is all about.

Before Tuesday afternoon it was possible to debate whether grown-ups in his administration might be able to rescue Trump from himself. After the live-on-TV moral failure of his ranting reaction to the tragedy in Charlottesville, Va., this is no longer a reasonable hope.

Trump, in the end, is Trump: ignorant, mendacious, self-absorbed, unwilling to stand up for basic decency, devoid of the most basic qualities needed to fill the office of president of the United States.

Nothing will change that. By giving aid and comfort to outright neo-Nazis he has failed the most fundamental duty of leadership. The only question for Americans is how they will respond. Will they call him out? Or will they stick with him on this flight into darkness?

It's instructive to see who passed this basic test this week, and who fell short.

First and most encouragingly, mayors, governors and ordinary citizens across the U.S. rallied against the most conspicuous symbols of white supremacy in their midst - statues and memorials to Confederate heroes.

The white racists who converged on Charlottesville came to protest plans to remove a statue of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee from a public park. Now, thanks to public revulsion at the violence and murder they brought with them, statues are coming down in many cities - Baltimore, New Orleans, Los Angeles and Lexington, Ky., among them.

This is the reaction of decent people who want to heal historic wounds, not tear them open as Trump did so cruelly and casually. Most Confederate monuments were erected decades after the Civil War as a calculated way of celebrating white domination. If this week spells the beginning of the end for them across the U.S., at least something positive will have come of it.

Second, America's business elite abandoned the president whose biggest boast was that he's one of them, a business mogul who can get things done. The CEOs of Merck, Tesla, Disney, Intel, Campbell Soup and others criticized Trump and quit a presidential advisory council of corporate leaders.

Before the revolt could grow, Trump petulantly shut down two advisory councils. In a final statement, they rebuked the president with words that ought to be entirely uncontroversial: "Intolerance, racism and violence have absolutely no place in this country and are an affront to core American values."

This would be embarrassing for any president. For a Republican whose key selling point was his claim that he's uniquely placed to enlist big business in a crusade to "Make America Great Again," it's particularly humiliating.

Corporate executives have customers and shareholders; aside from their own moral compass, they know which way the wind is blowing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Editorial Exchange: Who Passed and Who Failed the Trump Test This Week
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.