Back to School: How Mature Students Can Fund Continuing Education

By Sagan, Aleksandra | The Canadian Press, August 18, 2017 | Go to article overview

Back to School: How Mature Students Can Fund Continuing Education


Sagan, Aleksandra, The Canadian Press


How mature students can make back to school plans

--

VANCOUVER - When Kear Porttris decided to pursue a university degree in 2010, he had to contend with responsibilities that don't cross the minds of many freshman straight out of high school, including paying his mortgage and feeding his daughter.

Mature students who return to education have much more complex financial lives, experts say, and determining how to pay thousands of dollars in tuition, books and other expenses can be tricky. But with proper planning, a university degree can offer a good return on investment.

Money coach Melanie Buffel, who returned to complete her MBA as a single mom more than 20 years after finishing her last degree, says adults must plan carefully before returning to school as a mature student.

"There's a lot of homework," says Buffel, who works with Money Coaches Canada.

She suggests prospective students should first add up all the costs of school, including easily overlooked items such as additional childcare and transportation.

With a clear picture of how much money is needed, the next step is to determine whether to work full-time, part-time or not at all during their studies.

Continuing to work can be good for more than just a paycheque, she says.

Some employers will help fund continuing studies -- usually so long as the worker remains with the company for a set period of time after graduation -- and may continue to provide various health and life insurance benefits.

After estimating how much they'll earn while in school, she says, students can determine other sources that can be tapped to make up for any shortfall. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Back to School: How Mature Students Can Fund Continuing Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.