Editorial Exchange: A Vacant Presidency

The Canadian Press, August 18, 2017 | Go to article overview

Editorial Exchange: A Vacant Presidency


Editorial Exchange: A vacant presidency

--

An editorial from the Halifax Chronicle Herald, published Aug. 18:

Even before his stubbornly inadequate response to last weekend's racist violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, Donald Trump was proving himself to be the weakest American president of modern times and, arguably, ever.

"Weak" is a taunt Mr. Trump loves to toss at critics in his compulsive tweeting.

But it is a witheringly accurate description of his first seven months as an ineffective chief executive of the United States government.

So far, he has achieved almost nothing, largely because he seems not to understand or care about a lot of things.

These things include the nature and limits of the president's power, how to deal with Congress, the role of courts and the press, details of legislation and how to assemble a competent, credible team of White House officials and communicators.

As a result, the Trump White House has been in a constant state of war with the courts, the Congress, the press, its own party and itself.

Judges have quashed executive orders. Legislators have refused to be bullied into passing a half-baked health insurance repeal. Generals aren't listening to Trump tweets banning gays and lesbians from the military. Senior Republicans are rebelling against Trump abuse. The White House is a bedlam of infighting, leaks, contradictory statements and sudden firings. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Editorial Exchange: A Vacant Presidency
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.