Today in Music History - Aug. 28

The Canadian Press, August 18, 2017 | Go to article overview

Today in Music History - Aug. 28


Today in Music History - Aug. 28

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Today in Music History for Aug. 28:

In 1948, Danny Seraphine, the original drummer and founding member of "Chicago," was born in the city from which the group takes its name. Called the "Chicago Transit Authority" for its first album in 1969, the group soon shortened its name and altered its jazz-rock style to a more melodic pop approach. Among "Chicago's" hits during the 1970s were "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?," "25 or 6 to 4," "Saturday in the Park" and "Feelin' Stronger Every Day." After a downturn in fortunes in the late '70s, "Chicago" hit No. 1 on the Billboard pop chart in 1982 with "Hard to Say I'm Sorry." Seraphine was let go from "Chicago" in May 1990. He then worked on musical and theatrical projects, including producing and seeking investment for Broadway shows. He's also worked as executive producer on movies.

In 1961, Motown released its first No. 1 hit, "Please Mr. Postman" by "The Marvelettes."

In 1963, "Peter, Paul and Mary" performed "Blowin' in the Wind" before 200,000 civil rights marchers gathered in front of the Lincoln Memorial to hear Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. The trio also joined Joan Baez and Bob Dylan to lead the demonstrators in singing "We Shall Overcome."

In 1964, "The Beatles" performed before 15,000 screaming fans at the first of two concerts at the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium in New York. After the first concert, "The Beatles" met Bob Dylan, who is reported to have introduced John, Paul, George and Ringo to marijuana.

In 1965, Bob Dylan, backed by Levon Helm, Robbie Robertson and other musicians who later became known as "The Band," was booed off stage at Forest Hills Stadium in New York for playing electric guitar. Dylan had abandoned pure folk music earlier that year with the album "Bringing It All Back Home."

In 1965, "The Rolling Stones" announced that Allen Klein would join Andrew Loog Oldham in managing their career. Oldham had been directing the band on his own since 1963. On the same day, "The Stones" announced they had signed a new five-year recording contract with British Decca. After splitting with the group, Klein briefly managed business affairs for "The Beatles."

In 1965, country singer Shania Twain was born Eilleen Regina Edwards in Windsor, Ont. Growing up in Timmins, Ont., she began her music career as the headline vocalist in musical productions at a northern Ontario resort. Focusing on country music, she recorded a demo tape in Nashville in 1991 followed by her first album. But it was her 1994 followup, "The Woman In Me," that made Twain a major international star with more than 10 million albums sold and four top-10 country hits. That album was her first with her producer, songwriting partner and now ex-husband Robert (Mutt) Lange. Twain's 1997 album, "Come On Over" was even more of a smash, with such hit tracks as "You're Still The One," "From This Moment On", "That Don't Impress Me Much" and "Man! I Feel Like A Woman." By March 2000, that album was confirmed as both the best-selling album in country music history, and the best-selling album ever by a female artist. Twain has won several awards including Grammys, Junos and American Music Awards.

In 1967, the "Grateful Dead" and "Big Brother and the Holding Company" played at the wake for Hell's Angel member (Chocolate George) Hendricks. Hendricks was struck by a car driven by a tourist in San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury section.

In 1972, "David Bowie and the Spiders from Mars" made their debut at Carnegie Hall in New York. The show featured Bowie in futuristic costumes, outlandish makeup and orange hair. But Bowie was sick with the flu for the New York concert and gave a lacklustre performance.

In 1973, Bobby (Boris) Pickett was awarded a gold record for "Monster Mash" after the novelty tune made the charts for the second time. It was a No. 1 hit when first released in 1962, and made No. …

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