Editorial Exchange: Commander-in-Chief of America's Bigots

By Roe, John | The Canadian Press, August 18, 2017 | Go to article overview

Editorial Exchange: Commander-in-Chief of America's Bigots


Roe, John, The Canadian Press


Editorial Exchange: Commander-in-chief of America's bigots

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An editorial from the Hamilton Spectator, published Aug. 16:

To the fires of hatred and racism ignited in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend, Donald Trump delivered a tanker filled with gasoline.

The conflagration still burns.

To an America pained by the open wounds of its own unresolved fears and inequalities, the president swung a butcher's knife sharpened on the whetstone of his own ignorance.

The patient still bleeds.

Trump had a chance and challenge to say what needed to be said after hate groups rampaged through that southern college town on Saturday and a man with ties to the extreme right drove his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, leaving one woman dead.

History will judge Trump's response as an abject failure.

The inability of the world's most powerful man to properly censure an evil fraternity of neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members and white-power thugs along with his stubborn insistence they are no different than the people opposing them represents the low point of his presidency.

It also signals an emergency for the United States.

Beyond any job description set down in law and beyond all the trappings of power meant to inspire national pride in America's leader, the president of the United States is supposed to be an ethical commander-in-chief who directs that nation ever upward toward its shining goals of freedom and equality for all.

Trump is dragging it down into a dark cellar of intolerance where the bogeymen waving swastika flags are all too real.

First, he was inexcusably late in responding to the violence. …

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