Pune Houses India's Oldest Economics Research and Training Institute

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India), August 23, 2017 | Go to article overview

Pune Houses India's Oldest Economics Research and Training Institute


India, Aug. 23 -- The premises of Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics, despite being a part of modern city, reminiscences the old bungalow culture of Pune. It is spread over 10 acres, including five for residential area and five for the institute. Freedom fighter and politician Gopal Krishna Gokhale lived in this picturesque campus and recently the Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC) renovated his ancestral residence. Another point of interest in the campus is the huge banyan tree under which Gokhale would often have discussions with Mahatma Gandhi, who considered Gokhale to be his political guru.

Established in 1930 by the Servants of India Society, the institute is known to be the oldest research and training institute in economics in the country. It is mainly dedicated to research into the socio-economic dimensions of the Indian society. Carrying forward the legacy of Gopal Krishna Gokhale who founded the Servants of India Society in 1905, the inception of the institute was to promote education among Indians for the governance of the nation post Independence.

Because of limited financial resources, it was decided that the institute would initially devote attention to the study of economic problems, local and regional fact-finding investigations, as such investigation work then was relatively neglected.

Marketing of fruit in Pune was the first investigational project undertaken by the institute. After its completion, attention was directed to the basic methodological problem of adapting the survey method. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Pune Houses India's Oldest Economics Research and Training Institute
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.