Cultural Marxism's Impact a Growing Threat to Society

The Scotsman, August 28, 2017 | Go to article overview

Cultural Marxism's Impact a Growing Threat to Society


T hose who have observed the rise of political correctness, and the danger of speaking the accepted truth of certain matters in public for fear of prosecution, may wonder why society has changed so much.

The answer is Cultural Marxism, a development of the former failed anti-capitalist Marxist workers movement. This cultural version is dedicated to creating a new society by demolishing custom and tradition, prior to rebuilding with its own standards.

With no god other than itself, it has no moral code, so lies and deceit are used to achieve its ends. Marxists promote non-Western cultures and religions, and anti-Western education curricula. Mass immigration from third world countries - a prime objective - has already taken place under the Blair/Brown/Darling and Mandelson regime of the late 1990s. That economically inept wrecking crew also unknowingly made strides towards the achievement of another Marxist objective - the destruction of capitalism.

Social guilt is promoted, particularly by television, which has become the organ of the Left by virtue of its EU funding, and from the influence of its journalists and editors, mostly of the bien pensant and anti-British view.

A good example was seen during the Somerset Levels flooding of 2013/14, when Jon Snow of Channel 4 was reluctantly standing in waist deep water interviewing a clearly distraught couple whose house behind them was submerged and ruined. "Of course," said Snow cheerily to the weeping housewife, "This is nothing. …

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