Today in History - Sept. 7

The Canadian Press, September 7, 2017 | Go to article overview

Today in History - Sept. 7


Today in History - Sept. 7

--

Today in History for Sept. 7:

In 1533, England's future Queen Elizabeth I was born to King Henry VIII and Queen Anne Boleyn. She ruled 45 years, from 1558 to 1603.

In 1763, Britain's King George III issued a proclamation urging subjects to settle in Canada.

In 1813, the nickname "Uncle Sam" was first used as a symbolic reference to the United States in an editorial in a newspaper in Troy, N.Y.

In 1816, "The Frontenac," the first Canadian-built steamship on the Great Lakes, was launched at Ernestown (now Bath), Ont.

In 1822, Brazil declared its independence from Portugal.

In 1860, the Maple Leaf was first used as an official emblem during a visit to Toronto by the Prince of Wales.

In 1892, James Corbett knocked out John L. Sullivan in the 21st round of their heavyweight boxing match in New Orleans. It was the first major title bout to be fought under the Marquess of Queensbury rules.

In 1901, the Peace of Peking was signed by China and 11 foreign countries, ending "The Boxer Rebellion."

In 1907, the British liner RMS Lusitania set out from Liverpool, England, on its maiden voyage, arriving six days later in New York. On May 7, 1915 during the First World War, it was sunk by a German submarine off the coast of Ireland with the loss of nearly 1,200 civilian lives.

In 1910, the International Court at The Hague resolved a fishing dispute between the United States, Canada and Newfoundland. The court ruled that each government had the right to regulate its own fisheries but suggested Canada and Newfoundland inform the United States at least two months before they made any changes to their regulations.

In 1916, the U.S. Senate ratified the purchase of the Virgin Islands.

In 1927, American television pioneer Philo T. Farnsworth, 21, succeeded in transmitting the image of a line through purely electronic means with a device called an "image dissector."

In 1940, what came to be called "The Blitz" began when London suffered the first concentrated night air raid by German planes during the Second World War. In the first three nights, 1,000 people were killed and 3,500 seriously injured. The Royal Air Force prevented invasion during 1940, but the civilian population endured years of bombing before the tide of war turned.

In 1952, the Canadian liner "Princess Kathleen" ran aground and sank off Lena Point, Alaska. Her 300 passengers and crew of 115 were all rescued. The incident occurred during the highest tide of the season, and it was the falling tide that sank her.

In 1958, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev announced that any attack on China would be regarded as an attack on the Soviet Union.

In 1959, Quebec Premier Maurice Duplessis died in Schefferville, Que. He founded the Union Nationale party in 1936 and led it to victory in a provincial election that year. Duplessis's first term was a disappointment and his government was defeated in 1939. The Union Nationale was returned to office in 1944 and Duplessis remained in office until his death.

In 1969, the Official Languages Act declared English and French as the official languages of Canada. The act, promoted by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, declared all federal institutions had to provide services in English or French at the customer's choice.

In 1973, the Northwest Territories Supreme Court allowed the Indian Brotherhood of the N.W.T. to file a land claim for one-third of the territory.

In 1977, Cindy Nicholas of Toronto became the first woman to complete a return, non-stop swim of the English Channel.

In 1977, the United States and Panama signed treaties calling for the U.S. to give up control of the Panama Canal by 2000.

In 1983, the Canadian tour of the Moscow Circus was cancelled after five of the nine cities on the tour cancelled performances in reaction to the Korean airline disaster. Two-hundred and sixty-nine people, including 10 Canadians, were killed when the Soviet Union shot down Korean Air Lines Flight 007 after it accidentally entered Soviet airspace on Sept. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Today in History - Sept. 7
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.