Computers Assisted Instruction in Refining the Quality of Teaching and Learning

By Dangwal, Kiran Lata; Khare, Shruti | Techno Learn, December 2016 | Go to article overview

Computers Assisted Instruction in Refining the Quality of Teaching and Learning


Dangwal, Kiran Lata, Khare, Shruti, Techno Learn


"The real danger is not that computers will begin to think like men, but that men will begin to think like computers."

Above said line by Sydney J. Harris appropriately depict that inventions of computers have brought a major technological change in our life. The teacher is responsible for introducing concepts to students in class and scheduling topics for review and practice, which students will work on at instructional terminals Daily reports, inform the teacher of each student's performance and progress.

Accepted teaching and learning practices have undergone changes of revolutionary proportions in recent years. These changes are evident in situations as diverse as early childhood teaching, university physics teaching and workplace training. They have been underpinned by shifts in psychological and pedagogical theory, the most recent of which fit broadly under the heading of constructivism. Computer is a fast and accurate data manipulating device that accepts and stores data and produces a meaningful result under the stored set of instructions provided in the programme. It is a device which is derived from human intelligence. It is not an extremely fast information processing machine which, neither processes intelligence of its own nor has any thinking, arguing or decision taking power of its own. The development of information and technology enables the application of computers in the language learning process, which is known as Computer Assisted Learning (CAL). But there is still a question whether computers really assist second language learning. Many teachers who have never touched a computer tend to respond with an emphatic no; whereas, the overwhelming number of teachers who give computers a try find that they are indeed useful in second language learning. The responds indeed depend on the teachers' willingness to develop their teaching methods by utilizing the technology.

Undoubtedly, computers make excellent teaching tools, especially in teaching languages in any aspect, such as vocabulary, grammar, composition, pronunciation, or other linguistic and pragmatic-communicative skills.

The aim of this paper is to inform both educators and learners how computers are helping them and analyze the advantages of the utilization of computer in teaching and learning. When the advantages of using computer in teaching and learning understood well by teachers, learners and all stakeholders, it will be very useful to help learners improve their teaching and learning. Furthermore, there is a belief that through the use of it students are going to improve various skills.

The paper focuses on the advantages of using CAI for learners and teachers. Furthermore, there is a belief that through the use of it students are going to improve some skills, such as pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar, listening comprehension, and others on their own.

COMPUTER AS AN EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL AID

Educators use a computer technology to create a rich environment where students can show their capacity. It provides for opportunities for students in active participation, exploration and research. In this context, one of the ways by which computer technology can be made useful in the classroom is CAI i.e. Computer Assisted Instruction.

Lawrence Sturlow & Daniel Davis (1965) developed a complex model of teaching in which computer can present the instruction in place of teacher. This model is known as Computer Assisted Instruction. "CAI refers to the use of computer and software programmes to assist the delivery of information and students" (Wright & Forcier). Thus CAI refers to the application of computer software with the intention to fulfil the student's needs. CAI, an educational programme, is designed to serve as a teaching tool. It enables students to work at their own pace. It has been found to be very effective in the teaching of basic skills.

COMPUTER ASSISTED INSTRUCTION (CAI)

CAI deals with flexible, rapidly changing and detailed information. …

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