'A Huge Boon:' Alberta Town Hopes to Pull New Kind of Energy from Old Gas Well

By Weber, Bob | The Canadian Press, September 28, 2017 | Go to article overview

'A Huge Boon:' Alberta Town Hopes to Pull New Kind of Energy from Old Gas Well


Weber, Bob, The Canadian Press


Town to pull new kind of energy from gas well

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EDMONTON - An Alberta town is planning to pull a different kind of energy from the abandoned oil and gas wells that ring its outskirts.

Hinton, west of Edmonton on the edge of the Rocky Mountains, is teaming up with academic researchers and the private sector to install what may be Canada's first geothermal heating system in its downtown core.

And some say it could change the ground rules for industry all over Alberta.

"It would be a huge boon for the economy of this province," said Jonathan Banks, a University of Alberta geologist who's working on the project.

The town and Calgary-based Epoch Energy propose to re-open an abandoned gas well near the community and use heat from the bottom of the hole to warm municipal buildings.

Water five kilometres down simmers at 120 C. It would be pumped topside and used to warm another fluid, which would be piped downtown to the networked buildings. The water would then be re-injected.

One study has run the numbers for 12 public buildings, including schools, government offices, the hospital and the RCMP detachment. The $10.2 million cost would be paid back in 16 years at current natural gas prices. The town would cut its CO2 emissions -- and associated carbon tax costs -- by 3,795 tonnes a year.

"It makes sense," said Hinton Mayor Rob Mackin. "We were built on resources and this is just an extension of that."

Banks draws a distinction between ground source heat pumps in common use and true geothermal energy. The first, he says, draws on solar energy stored in the top layers of the Earth while the second uses heat actually generated in the depths.

The geothermal concept is widely used around the world, but Hinton's version has a few wrinkles.

Rocks beneath the town contain tiny pores which hold oil, gas and water. Pump those pores dry and rocks behave differently. Those differences are well-understood for hydrocarbons, but not water.

"When it's related to oil and gas, we know everything," said Banks. "When it's related to geothermal, we actually don't know any of this stuff."

Water from that far down is full of salts and other materials such as heavy metals. …

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