--Ontario Update-

The Canadian Press, September 28, 2017 | Go to article overview

--Ontario Update-


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(Plants-Trial)

Prosecutors at the trial of two former Ontario political aides say they will continue with their next witnesses after the judge ruled a O-P-P officer could not testify as an expert.

Ontario court Judge Timothy Lipson ruled that Robert Gagnon was too close to the investigation known as Project Hampden to offer impartial evidence as legally required.

Prosecution lawyer Tom Lemon told Lipson it was too soon to determine the impact of the ruling, but said he planned to go ahead with another witness.

David Livingston and Laura Miller are accused of illegally destroying emails related to the costly cancellation of gas plants before the 2011 provincial election, they've both pleaded not guilty. (The Canadian Press)

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(Plane-Crash-TSB)

The Transportation Safety Board says a fatal plane crash in northwestern Ontario was caused by ice accumulation and too much cargo weight.

A report says the Wasaya Airways plane crashed less than 10 minutes after taking off from Pickle Lake, north of Thunder Bay, on a cargo flight in December of 2015.

T-S-B investigators say the icing conditions exceeded the capabilities of the Cessna aircraft.

They say the plane also had a heavy amount of weight on takeoff and these factors caused it to stall, lose control and crash. (The Canadian Press)

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(Child-Death-Trial)

A London woman and her former boyfriend have been found guilty in the 2014 death of her 20-month-old son.

The pair were accused of failing to seek medical attention for the boy after he was scalded by a cup of hot coffee that spilled on him.

The boy, named Ryker, died of dehydration and shock a few days later.

A London judge found Amanda Dumont and Scott Bakker guilty of criminal negligence causing death and failing to provide the necessaries of life in the death. (BlackburnNews. …

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