Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton, Two Former First Ladies, Throw Shade on the Ladies

Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, October 2, 2017 | Go to article overview

Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton, Two Former First Ladies, Throw Shade on the Ladies


Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton, former first ladies and sisters in grief, have been unloading of late upon some of their gender, the women who voted for Trump against Clinton, and thus have let all women down.

"You don't like your voice. You like the thing you're told to like," Michelle scolded.

Clinton maintained that women had caved under pressure, from fathers and husbands and boyfriends and bosses, who told them never to vote for "the girl." Other feminists have said that they were racist in supporting white men over sisters "of color;" or opportunists in clinging to men who held power; or secret misogynists, haters of women, who had come to despise their own kind.

But the Guardian, the liberal British sheet that has supported the feminists, reported last week that women had seldom voted on gender, but voted instead on their perceived interests, as determined quite often by class. Unlike some groups which go in for bloc voting, "women...lack social identity bonds," and do not see themselves as a part of a movement. A feminist movement exists, but it's ideological, and too small in most places to swing an election.

"False assumptions that women will vote as a unified bloc go back to the earliest days," the piece noted. Indeed, what broke on November the 8th was not the non-existent "glass ceiling" but the myth that the feminist movement was a movement by and for women, which now has been shattered for good.

The surprise, in fact, is how long the myth lasted, as feminists themselves have both attacked other women, and defended men against women for years. They affected rage (and most likely felt it) at the Access Hollywood tapes, while they themselves supported Bill Clinton, who told Paula Jones "kiss it," assaulted Kathleen Willey inside of the White House, exploited an intern, and then had aides slander her, and was the subject of a rape accusation from Juanita Broaddrick that was wholly ignored by the left. …

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