By 8:30 A.M., Dozens of Students Were Already in Their Seats, Reviewing Their Notes and Readying Their Computer Terminals for an Impending Cyber Attack [Derived Headline]

By Martines, Jamie | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, October 4, 2017 | Go to article overview

By 8:30 A.M., Dozens of Students Were Already in Their Seats, Reviewing Their Notes and Readying Their Computer Terminals for an Impending Cyber Attack [Derived Headline]


Martines, Jamie, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


By 8:30 a.m., dozens of students were already in their seats, reviewing their notes and readying their computer terminals for an impending cyber attack.

Teams of four assembled to discuss strategy: Who knows Linux best? Does anyone have notes about security permissions? How can we make the network secure?

The first annual Air Force Association CyberCamp at the University of Pittsburgh came to a close as students from 54 area high schools tested their newly acquired cyber-defense skills in a competition on Friday.

The free camp, held for the first time at the University of Pittsburgh, was the only Air Force Association CyberCamp held in Pennsylvania this summer. It was also the largest of 66 CyberCamps in the country, with 211 students enrolled. Two students attended from New Jersey and Delaware.

About 30 percent of the camp’s attendees were young women, according to David Hickton, founding director of the University of Pittsburgh Institute for Cyber Law, Policy and Security.

Nationwide, about 21 percent of information security analysts are women, according to 2016 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Students studied Windows and Linux operating systems throughout the week and applied that knowledge during Friday’s competition. The students weren’t learning to hack, instructors said; rather, their job was to play defense against potential hackers.

But that’s not the only thing they learned, according to Joseph Stabile, a camp instructor and rising junior at the University of Pittsburgh majoring in international politics and security studies.

“It was cool to see everyone work together,” Stabile said, adding that the students all came in at different levels of experience. …

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