Alice McDermott Captures Bygone Era of Brooklyn

By Levin, Ann | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), October 8, 2017 | Go to article overview

Alice McDermott Captures Bygone Era of Brooklyn


Levin, Ann, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Alice McDermott's stunning new novel, "The Ninth Hour," does for contemporary literature what "Call the Midwife" has done for public television.

Both recall an earlier era when women in religious orders operated as de facto social service agencies, nursing the sick, clothing the poor and doing whatever they had to do to keep destitute families together.

The novel begins on a somber note. A handsome young Irish immigrant named Jim has killed himself for what appears to be the most capricious of reasons. He was a man, we are told, who believed "that the hours of his life ... belonged to himself alone." Later, darker aspects of his personality will emerge.

In the meantime, his suicide drives the plot forward, casting a shadow over the lives of his widow, Annie, and their unborn daughter, Sally and requiring a cover-up in their Brooklyn, New York, parish because the Catholic church at the time considered suicide a sin.

Most of the novel's events occur during Sally's childhood and adolescence, but it is narrated by her adult children, who are seeking, many years later, to understand their family's tangled secret history. And though the book begins in a minor chord "February 3 was a dark and dank day altogether ..." the story is exhilarating, largely because of McDermott's lyrical language and unforgettable characters.

First and foremost are the nuns of the Little Nursing Sisters of the Sick Poor, who give Annie a job in the convent laundry after Jim's death and help her raise Sally. …

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