Insightful 'Dolores' Profiles Polarizing Activist Dolores Huerta

By Terry, Josh | Deseret News (Salt Lake City), October 6, 2017 | Go to article overview

Insightful 'Dolores' Profiles Polarizing Activist Dolores Huerta


Terry, Josh, Deseret News (Salt Lake City)


By Josh Terry

For the Deseret News

"DOLORES" - ??? - Hillary Clinton, Angela Davis, Dolores Huerta, Gloria Steinem; not rated; in general release

Peter Bratt's documentary "Dolores" tells the story of Dolores Huerta, a lifetime activist who worked alongside Cesar Chavez on behalf of Latino and women's rights.

While the surface narrative follows chronologically through Huerta's various efforts, "Dolores" gradually paints the portrait of an unsung hero who hasn't enjoyed the recognition of other male activists like Chavez.

After a montage of contemporary endorsements from politicians like former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and former U.S. President Barack Obama, "Dolores" begins in rural 1940s California, where Huerta originally set out on a traditional path as a married wife and mother.

But the injustices she witnessed as a teenager awoke a sense of social awareness. After meeting an activist named Fred Ross, Huerta became a community organizer, launching a career that the now-87-year-old continues today.

The heart of Bratt's documentary is Huerta's time with the United Farm Workers union, which she co-founded with Chavez in the 1960s. Her efforts with the union are presented as a contemporary movement of the Martin Luther King Jr.'s civil rights efforts, and she is held up alongside King, Gandhi and Robert F. Kennedy.

Her friendship with Kennedy is especially highlighted, and in one of the film's more somber moments, we learn that Huerta was with the presidential hopeful at the time of his assassination in 1968 following the California primary.

But "Dolores" also celebrates Huerta's happier moments. It illustrates her involvement in a national grape boycott, a farm workers' march to Sacramento in 1966, and how Obama adapted her "Si Se Puede" slogan into his "Yes We Can" campaign theme.

Bratt brings these events to life through a generous mix of file footage and personal interviews with Huerta's children, activist peers and Huerta, who addresses the camera directly. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Insightful 'Dolores' Profiles Polarizing Activist Dolores Huerta
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.