Explaining Electronic Learning Management Systems (ELMS) Continued Usage Intentions among Facilitators in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in Tanzania

By Muries, Bruckse; Masele, Juma James | International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology, January 1, 2017 | Go to article overview

Explaining Electronic Learning Management Systems (ELMS) Continued Usage Intentions among Facilitators in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in Tanzania


Muries, Bruckse, Masele, Juma James, International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology


INTRODUCTION

According to Ayub et al (2010) Electronic Learning Management System (ELMS) is referred to as a web based technology that assists in planning distribution and, monitoring and evaluation of a learning process and insisted that it must be incorporated in the education delivery. Alharbi & Drew (2014), refer ELMS as an e-learning platform/system which is made available to assist students and facilitators have access to online learning materials and services. As a web based, ELMS is considered by Ayub et al (2010) as Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) which offers flexible education delivery between teachers and students in e-learning environments. The system has variety of features to allow provision of assignments to student including grading and other related activities. As such Higher Education Institutions (HEI) have widely adopted the technology and are using it in making controls; doing performance management, as a tool for assessment, managing study schedule and provision of learning contents. The ELMS is enabled by a number of technical issues that range from hardware servers, registrations, organization administration, space for storage, accessing and place for sharing materials supported in a number of formats such as HTML, MPEG, PDF, MS Office word etc. (Sife, Luoga, & Sanga, 2007). As such ELMS are of recently been acknowledged to support learning opportunities around the globe and it is a facility that provides means for education delivery and flexibility for HEIs (Alharbi & Drew, 2014; Ayub et al., 2010; Lwoga & Komba, 2015). It is then used by students, academic facilitators, and administrators in trainings and management of online learning (Sife et al., 2007).

Evidences indicate that ELMS has turned a common application among HEIs over the globe, with differences remaining contextual and in terms of extent. For example, in the United States of America (USA) and the United Kingdom (UK) the ELM is currently used in universities as a more or less a requirement in academic educational knowledge delivery. Studies document that more than 90% of Universities and Colleges in the USA use the system and about 95% of Universities in the UK's HEIs have been using ELMS (Al-Busaidi & Al-Shihi, 2010). Already, a relatively great potential have been recorded in most developing countries including the Middle East (Mirza & Alabdulkareem, 2011) and Africa (Lwoga & Komba, 2015; Raisamo & Mtebe, 2014). Although usage is still dawdling in developing countries, the system has recorded a great potential by 28.8% (Mirza & Al-abdulkareem, 2011) and has provided a solution to variety of issues in the educational deliverance (Al-Busaidi & Al-Shihi, 2010; Asiri, Mahmud, Abu, & Ayub, 2012; Mirza & Al-abdulkareem, 2011). A survey done by Gakio in 2006 from 27 countries in Africa, recorded that 54 HEIs had adopted various E-learning systems for academic delivery (Gakio, 2006). Obadara (2014) did a study at the University of Lagos on students' academic performance using the moodle LMS. In that study, it was revealed that using the LMS in teaching students have significant positive impacts on their academic performance. Later recommended that ELMS should be used in all universities in Nigeria and all features of the system should be used for the better education delivery and students' performance (Obadara, 2014).

In Tanzania, most of HEIs started implementing ICT enabled LMS in 1998 and have been investing in the technology with an attempt to enhance teaching activities and learning processes (Komba, 2009; Lwoga & Komba, 2015). The University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM) began using the Blackboard (Komba, 2009) which aimed at integrating the face to face learning with the online learning (Raphael & Mtebe, 2013). The system was later replaced with Open Source Moodle system in 2008 after experiencing the increasing in the annual licensing costs which was higher for the budget to cover. …

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