Law Enforcement Leaders Urge Trump, Sessions Admin to Get on Board with Criminal Justice Reform

By Cohen, Kelly | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, October 18, 2017 | Go to article overview

Law Enforcement Leaders Urge Trump, Sessions Admin to Get on Board with Criminal Justice Reform


Cohen, Kelly, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


Top law enforcement leaders sent President Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions a letter Wednesday urging the administration to get on board with what they call bipartisan criminal justice reform.

Members of Law Enforcement Leaders to Reduce Crime and Incarceration -- a group of current and former police chiefs, sheriffs, district attorneys, federal and state prosecutors, and attorneys general -- urged Trump and Sessions to "join the bipartisan effort for criminal justice reform, and align its policy agenda with that mission" in their letter.

The letter came as the law enforcement group gathered its members, as well as former Attorney General Eric Holder and former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates in Washington to talk about criminal justice reform.

Sen. Thom Tillis and Rep. Doug Collins, two Republicans, were scheduled to speak but pulled out at the last moment due to what Tillis' office said was a report that the event "would be used as a platform for partisan criticism of the administration, which has strongly supported the law enforcement community."

Trump and Sessions have both made their support for law enforcement a top priority, and Sessions has also addressed federal sentencing policy that has drawn both support and criticism.

Despite this, Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, and Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., reintroduced a bipartisan criminal justice reform bill earlier this month that failed to make it to the Senate floor last year.

The Wednesday letter acknowledges Sessions' policy changes as they pertain to sentencing, as well as how he opposed the aforementioned bipartisan criminal justice reform legislation while a senator, but attempt argue how he should be for it.

"From our experience, we do not believe that always seeking the longest possible sentence will make our country safer. More than 25 percent of the Justice Department's budget is consumed by federal prisons. Every unnecessary dollar spent on prisons is a dollar not spent on policing. And often, the best way to prevent recidivism is through treatment, not prison," the letter reads, requesting the Trump administration sign the Grassley-Durbin legislation into law if and when it gets to the president's desk. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Law Enforcement Leaders Urge Trump, Sessions Admin to Get on Board with Criminal Justice Reform
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.