How the Right Lost Millennials and College Students

Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, October 30, 2017 | Go to article overview

How the Right Lost Millennials and College Students


Why are millennials progressively (pun intended) leaning more towards the left side of the political spectrum, rather than the right? Why did 55 percent of millennials vote for Hillary Clinton compared, to 37 percent for Donald Trump?

The numbers are roughly similar to the 2012 election, where 60 percent of millennials preferred Barack Obama to 37 percent for Mitt Romney. In fact, the 5 percent that Clinton lost compared to Obama actually benefited Bernie Sanders the most, exposing a pull even further to the left for young voters. In party affiliations, a similar story can be found: 57 percent of millennials lean Democrat vs. 36 percent leaning Republican, according to the Pew Research Center. So, what explains this inevitable drag of millennials farther left? And why the growing desertion of young adults from the Republican Party?

To understand a perceptual shift in the mindset of a certain segment of the population, it is helpful to look at their social circles where they may be influenced. When it comes to young people, look no further than our universities.

The growing phenomenon of political correctness has immensely affected colleges. That is easy to understand when you consider that liberal professors outnumber conservative ones by a 12 to 1 ratio, an unbelievably worrying statistic.

The university is where a lot of one's self-esteem is formed, and where young impressionable minds first seek guidance outside of their immediate family. Such guidance is provided by professors and faculty who hold tremendous respect and credibility in the eyes of students. This is a dangerous equation, because students often look up to this infrastructure for mentorship. When it is professors inciting this behavior, there is no authority ensuring some crucial boundaries are not crossed.

The university is now a prime outlet of left-leaning influence on young people. It is not uncommon to see incredibly violent protests by college students in opposition to a conservative speaker, whose opinions are deemed "hateful and oppressive." Mass vandalism and mob rule are deemed a fit responses to free speech. The University of Chicago, University of California, Berkeley, and even my very own NYU have been victims of such phenomena. Protesters often have the full support of their professors and faculty, who serve as either inspiration or motivators in these endeavors.

The appearances of conservative speakers Ben Shapiro and Milo Yiannopoulos at colleges are routinely and frequently interrupted, or even canceled by university leadership. On the other hand, the appearances of ultra-left-wing speakers only seem to increase. Look no further than the rise of Palestinian-American activist Linda Sarsour, one of the organizers of January Women's March, whose family ties to Hamas and Hamas-funding organizations have been well-documented. She was hastily invited to be the commencement speaker at the taxpayer-funded City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.

Even when university faculty are not directly forbidding conservative speakers from appearing, they often cancel the event for fear of an escalation of the violence by the protesters. Giving into "Heckler's Vetoes" sends students a message from university administrators: if you make enough of a mess, we will shut down events you don't agree with. Is that a good lesson to teach impressionable students?

Other instances of infringement of free speech include college administrations forbidding words such as "fireman" or "mankind" less the "gender neutral" or female population take offense to such un-specificity. …

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