Tories Say Harper's Letter Doesn't Change Their Approach to NAFTA

By Levitz, Stephanie | The Canadian Press, October 31, 2017 | Go to article overview

Tories Say Harper's Letter Doesn't Change Their Approach to NAFTA


Levitz, Stephanie, The Canadian Press


NAFTA letter catches Tories off guard

--

OTTAWA - Conservative foreign affairs critic Erin O'Toole was sitting in the departure lounge at Reagan National Airport in Washington, D.C., last week when his eyes landed on a story he wasn't expecting.

"'Napping on NAFTA': Harper blasts Trudeau government handling of negotiations,'" read the headline on a Canadian Press story about a memo written by former Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper.

"What?" O'Toole recalled thinking. "Oh, dear."

Harper had shared gloomy thoughts on the deal a few weeks earlier during an event in Washington, but the memo, which castigated the Liberals directly, was a rarity for an ex-political leader who has largely stayed away from any direct remarks on the current government since the 2015 federal election.

That the memo suddenly found its way into the public domain -- he'd been writing them for months and none have ever surfaced -- left political observers scratching their heads. Who would leak it? And why?

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wouldn't directly address the letter or its potential implications when asked about it on Monday.

"I hold the office of prime minister in high regard, and because of that I hold former prime ministers in high regard, and will not make any comments on what he had to say."

O'Toole was sitting at the airport having just wound up a trip to D.C. with the House of Commons foreign affairs committee to advocate for Canada's interests at the NAFTA talks, part of an ongoing collaborative approach the Conservatives are trying to take to the negotiations.

Harper's letter took a swing at Canada's negotiating strategy, suggesting the Liberals were letting the Americans run all over them and putting the future of NAFTA in real danger.

Some Tories say quietly they suspect an attempt to harm the Conservative Opposition and undermine leader Andrew Scheer's efforts to make a break from the Harper era.

The Liberals say Harper has jeopardized the talks by playing politics with the united front Canada is trying to put forward.

"I think he's got a grudge to hold and he's more interested in putting stuff out there that is going to do damage to our negotiating positions," Liberal MP Bob Nault, the chair of the committee, told CBC's "As It Happens."

Scheer said he didn't understand why the Liberals were making such a fuss. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Tories Say Harper's Letter Doesn't Change Their Approach to NAFTA
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.