Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta Backs Trump Administration on Overtime Rule

By Higgins, Sean | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, November 15, 2017 | Go to article overview

Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta Backs Trump Administration on Overtime Rule


Higgins, Sean, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta told a congressional panel Wednesday that the Trump administration was right to roll back several Obama administration efforts to expand workforce protection laws.

Acosta said the regulatory efforts, which covered overtime rules, retirement investment advice, corporate legal liability, and disclosure requirements by lawyers who practice labor law were overreaches that hurt the economy.

Acosta told the House Education and the Workforce Committee that the Obama-era changes may have been well-intended, noting for example that the overtime rule was last revised in 2004 and an update was called for. "The way the rule was changed, however, created a shock to the system," he said.

The Trump administration's work was applaud by committee Republicans, who agreed with Acosta's appraisal, and slammed by Democrats, who argued the administration was eroding workplace protections.

"This administration has consistently sided with business interests instead of workers and worker advocates, and I find that troubling," said Rep. Mark Takano, D-Calif.

Much of the hearing focused on the overtime rule. Federal law says employees must be paid time-and-a-half once they work more than 40 hours in a week. However, businesses may exempt workers from the requirement if their duties are "managerial" in nature and they reach a certain salary threshold.

Last year, the Labor Department announced that that threshold, previously $23,000 annually, would rise to more than $47,000 and would be updated every three years to reflect wage growth. The administration's rule change would have meant that 4 million more workers would be eligible for overtime.

A federal judge rejected the rule late last year. Takano pressed Acosta on why his department chose not to appeal the court's decision. The secretary replied that his department did appeal on the question of whether it had the authority to set a salary threshold, but added that he agreed with the court that the $47,000 figure was far too high. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta Backs Trump Administration on Overtime Rule
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.