How ‘the Lion King’ Changed Broadway

By Cox, Gordon | Variety, November 14, 2017 | Go to article overview

How ‘the Lion King’ Changed Broadway


Cox, Gordon, Variety


"The Lion King" turned 20 this month - but that's not the only big birthday on Broadway. When it opened on Nov. 13, 1997, "The Lion King" was an integral part of the transformation of Times Square from red-light district to family-friendly destination, laying the groundwork for the blockbuster era that defines the New York theater industry today. This month isn't just the 20th anniversary of "The Lion King"; it also marks two decades of the New Broadway.

On Nov. 5 Disney feted the show's anniversary by reuniting its creators and surprising the audience with a curtain-call performance by its composer, Elton John. For them it was a celebration of the show that helped legitimize the studio's stage arm in the eyes of the theater industry, becoming the signature smash of its ongoing Broadway output (including the current "Aladdin" and the upcoming "Frozen").

"The Lion King" now claims the crown as the top box office title in any medium ($7.9 billion worldwide and counting), something it only could have achieved in a Broadway climate that the show helped bring about.

Back when the musical opened at the New Amsterdam Theater, 42nd Street was a very different place. (The show has since moved to the Minskoff, making way for Disney's "Mary Poppins" and then "Aladdin.") Even as late as the '90s, the block still resembled the Deuce of the HBO series, a place for sex shops and drug deals instead of tourists catching a show.

The theater was a ruin. "There was a watchman who, in order to show you around, lit a roll of newspapers with a match like some medieval torch," remembers Cora Cahan, the longtime president of the nonprofit New 42nd Street.

The organization was one of the leading players in a massive city-state building initiative launched in 1990 to rejuvenate the block of 42nd Street between Seventh Avenue and Eighth Avenue. New 42nd Street laid the first claim to attracting family visitors to Times Square with the New Victory Theater, the all-ages performing arts presenter that opened in late 1995.

Disney's deal to renovate and reopen the New Amsterdam Theatre across the street - announced in early 1994 - played an important part in the area's overall rehabilitation, notes Cahan. …

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