We Are All Aware of Those in the Government and Public Policy Arena Who Hold Big Titles — Presidents, U.S. Senators, Governors — but among the Unique Elements of Our System of Governance Are the People Behind the Scenes Who Remain Largely Unknown to the General Public, but Whose Dedication to the Ideals of Our Great Nation Make the Official Wheels of Government Turn in the Right Direction [Derived Headline]

By Lowman, Henry | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 21, 2017 | Go to article overview

We Are All Aware of Those in the Government and Public Policy Arena Who Hold Big Titles — Presidents, U.S. Senators, Governors — but among the Unique Elements of Our System of Governance Are the People Behind the Scenes Who Remain Largely Unknown to the General Public, but Whose Dedication to the Ideals of Our Great Nation Make the Official Wheels of Government Turn in the Right Direction [Derived Headline]


Lowman, Henry, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


We are all aware of those in the government and public policy arena who hold big titles — presidents, U.S. senators, governors — but among the unique elements of our system of governance are the people behind the scenes who remain largely unknown to the general public, but whose dedication to the ideals of our great nation make the official wheels of government turn in the right direction.

Penn’s Wood lost one of those patriots recently with the passing of Frederick W. Anton III. You may never have heard of Anton, but there is no doubt he affected your life in some way. He was often referred to as a “power broker.”

But in his case, the power he wielded came not from public office, but from the respect he earned. And he used that power not for personal gain, but to create opportunity and expand liberty for all Pennsylvanians.

An attorney by profession and hugely successful in the insurance business, Anton turned much of his attention to politics. From his perch as head of the influential Pennsylvania Manufacturers Association (PMA), he gave audience to politicians from both parties who sought his advice, counsel and blessing.

Having risen to prominence through Richard Thornburgh’s successful campaign for governor, Anton established a policy seminar held each year during the annual Pennsylvania Society gathering in New York City. Pennsylvania Society weekend is largely a social affair for elected officials, would-be elected officials, and the state’s business elite and policy establishment.

Anton thought the weekend would benefit from a serious discussion of the issues confronting Pennsylvania, so he began the PMA seminar. Today, the seminar remains an island of seriousness in a sea of revelry. It is one of the most sought-after invitations of the weekend. …

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We Are All Aware of Those in the Government and Public Policy Arena Who Hold Big Titles — Presidents, U.S. Senators, Governors — but among the Unique Elements of Our System of Governance Are the People Behind the Scenes Who Remain Largely Unknown to the General Public, but Whose Dedication to the Ideals of Our Great Nation Make the Official Wheels of Government Turn in the Right Direction [Derived Headline]
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