White House Panel: Free Speech, Economic Policy, and Higher Education Reform Have Commonalities

Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, November 21, 2017 | Go to article overview

White House Panel: Free Speech, Economic Policy, and Higher Education Reform Have Commonalities


On Friday, the Millennial Advocacy Council hosted a policy conference at the White House to discuss the need for higher education reform. The panel featured Rep. Tom Garrett, R-Va.; Republican state Sen. Eric Brakey of Maine; and Young Americans for Liberty President Cliff Maloney Jr. The three leaders discussed student loan concerns, autonomy in education, and free speech.

As a local leader in the education community in Kentucky, I am elated to hear that a variety of conservative leaders are genuinely seeking reform. There are three key takeaways from the panel discussion at the White House last week. First, the more vested you are in a decision, the more likely you are to care about the issue. Second, we must protect freedom of speech in learning environments and beyond. And third, unprecedented levels of debt are crippling the economy and leaving the next generation in a vicious cycle of fiscal stagnation.

Political decisions are made at the local, state, and federal level. The difference does not only lie in the exact location of the building, but also in just how invested the decision makers are in the outcome. Local educators, parents, and state policymakers are inherently more vested in the outcomes of the educational attainment of their own students than those at the federal level. Restoring decision making to the most local level possible empowers everyone involved to make the best and most economical choices.

Coinciding with the retention of this power is the necessity for freedom of speech. We must protect and foster environments where people are comfortable expressing their viewpoints and ideas, even if they may be, at the time, a lone dissenting voice.

Free speech allows us to demur the prevailing viewpoint while advocating for another. For example, the position that not everyone needs to go to college in the traditional sense.

As a country, we are producing more college graduates than ever before, while concurrently leaving them woefully unprepared for the jobs that are available. This regrettable circumstance is saddling our rising generations with unprecedented levels of debt, while leaving them increasingly unemployable and unproductive in the economy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

White House Panel: Free Speech, Economic Policy, and Higher Education Reform Have Commonalities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.