Analyzing the Complexity of Black Identity

By Savage, Gia | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, November 30, 2017 | Go to article overview

Analyzing the Complexity of Black Identity


Savage, Gia, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


Dr. Robert Patterson's passion for education began early. As a young child, he carried a clipboard and wore glasses, as if he were already teaching a classroom.

"From Pre-K through 5, I went to Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary School in Hartford, Connecticut, which was predominantly Black," he says. "I lived in a predominately Black neighborhood, and all of my social interactions and institutions were majority Black."

When Patterson entered sixth grade, he participated in the Project Concern program, which is now called the Capital Region Educational Council.

"There was this passive acknowledgement that perhaps the schools in Hartford did not have the resources to provide said educational opportunities that I would get at another school," says Patterson. "But instead of trying to transform that school system, you take a handful of students, disperse them to other school systems, so that the central problem - which is the educational disparities - stays intact. But for a set of circumstances and luck, I might not have had that narrative."

This realization led him to write a term paper on school choice during his junior year in high school. "I do think it has its advantages, but clearly school choice obfuscates the need to address structural inequalities that [are] rooted along racial and economic lines," he says.

Patterson is now entering his second year as the inaugural chair of the Department of African American Studies at his alma mater, Georgetown University. The department came into fruition due to national events centered on race, student agitation and Georgetown's increasingly more public relationship to the institution of slavery, he says.

For three years, Patterson served as director of an interdisciplinary program that developed into the department he now chairs. His educational journey is marked by a deeply rooted desire to cultivate conversations and heighten people's awareness of issues surrounding African-Americans.

Initially, he wanted to get his six-year Educational Leadership Certificate, become the principal of a public school and ultimately become the superintendent of a school district. He began his studies at Georgetown University, after considering the University of Pennsylvania.

"Georgetown did not have a school of education, and the University of Pennsylvania did," he says. "But, I decided after some consultation with a couple of high school teachers and thinking about the long-term implications of what this decision would be that I did not have to go through a school of education, and I actually did not want a degree in education. I would prefer to have the content area and then if I later wanted to get a certification in teaching, I could do that, rather than being an expert in teaching. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Analyzing the Complexity of Black Identity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.