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In Fall 2015 the Michael Schwartz Library at Cleveland State University acquired the Darius Milhaud Society collection from the estate of its founder, Katherine Warne. The Darius Milhaud Society, founded in 1986, was a musical organization designed to promote and preserve the music and legacy of French twentieth-century composer Darius Milhaud. Warne studied composition with Milhaud during her undergraduate career at Mills College, and completed compositions, sketches, and homework during her time as a student with him. Upon graduating from Mills College in 1945, she maintained contact with Darius and Madeleine Milhaud (Darius's wife), often attending Milhaud's birthday celebrations at Mills College. Led by Warne, the Darius Milhaud Society published a newsletter for almost every season from 1985 to at least 2002. The newsletters, digitized and openly available in the library's institutional repository, contain details about performances and festivals of Milhaud's music, as well as a plethora of information relating to or directly about Darius Milhaud.

The Michael Schwartz Library serves as steward for the Darius Milhaud Society and Katherine Warne collections, which include photographs, Darius Milhaud Society correspondence, musical program guides, and original musical compositions by Darius Milhaud. These materials can be found in the online Cleveland Memory collection (http://cleveland memory.org/milhaud/) as digitized artifacts, in the library's Special Collections material, in the library's catalog, and as purchasable material related to Milhaud's life and memory in the library's institutional repository, EngagedScholarship. Those interested in more details about the collection should contact Mandi Goodsett at a.goodsett@csuohio.edu.

Amanda M. Goodsett

Cleveland State University

The Fine Arts Library at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) is radically transforming its spaces to serve the needs of new students in the College of Fine Arts and throughout the university. September 2016 marked the beginning of The Foundry, a maker space including a recording studio located on the third floor which is available to all UT students. In late April 2017, contractors took over the fourth floor and began demolishing the book stacks and walls. Over the summer a large classroom with adaptable technologies, a high-tech teaching lab equipped with iMacs and other devices, a state-of-the-art postproduction audio-visual studio, seminar rooms, and faculty offices for the Center for Arts and Entertainment Technologies (CAET) and the Center for Integrated Design (CID) were built. We are providing space for the college's new programs as they expand curricular offerings that involve teaching students innovation skills and design methodology for a fast-changing technological world. The library's grand staircase is now enclosed at the top so that the fifth floor can remain a quiet study area.

During the course of construction, staff moved more than 100,000 books, bound journals, and scores to offsite storage facilities, as well as the remaining 195,000 items that would fit in the stacks on the fifth floor of the building. …

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