Monetizing Entertainment: An Insider's Handbook for Careers in the Entertainment & Music Industry

By Garfrerick, Robert | MEIEA Journal, January 1, 2017 | Go to article overview

Monetizing Entertainment: An Insider's Handbook for Careers in the Entertainment & Music Industry


Garfrerick, Robert, MEIEA Journal


Larry Wacholtz. Monetizing Entertainment: An Insider's Handbook for Careers in the Entertainment & Music Industry. Beverly Schneller (editor). New York: Routledge, 2017. www.routledge. com

Monetizing Entertainment: An Insider 's Handbook for Careers in the Entertainment & Music Industry is a complete text suitable for any overview of the music and entertainment industry class. The book is 600 pages including appendices and was edited by Beverly Schneller. Most institutions involved with such programs organize their curricula around an overview class of this type serving as the beginning point of a journey leading to more in-depth study as the student progresses. The book is thorough, which is one of its strengths, and begins with a fairly lengthy chapter dealing with the history of the last twenty years in the entertainment industry, explaining and commenting on how the digital revolution changed the game. Understanding that piece gives important context to moving forward, particularly as it pertains to the monetization of assets, or even the identification of monetizable assets. Because of its overarching thoroughness, it is a good fit for these types of classes.

The section on copyright law, chapter three, The Rules of the Game, is particularly informative and useful to the novice or layperson regarding the matter of copyright law. There are a number of helpful graphs and charts that students may find enlightening while sorting out some of the complexities.

Wacholtz provides a wealth of information on the business of recording and recording studios in chapter seven, Recording Lightning in a Bottle. For the beginner, with no previous knowledge of how recordings are made, what the actual cost is, and the unions and other organizations involved, this is an outstanding foundation to understanding the process.

The book does bridge the music business with larger entertainment interests such as film and other media, and discussion of those industries is included across several chapters. Special attention is given to marketing, as one would expect given the theme of monetization and converting the consumption of entertainment to currency.

Wacholtz also does a good job giving background and context on the label business in chapter nine entitled Odds of the Game, condensing the history of how six majors became three. …

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