SMS Turns 25: SM Interestin Facts N Y It Bcame Obsolete

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India), December 5, 2017 | Go to article overview

SMS Turns 25: SM Interestin Facts N Y It Bcame Obsolete


India, Dec. 4 -- SMS or Short Messaging Service turned 25 years old on Sunday. Ever since the first SMS was sent, the messaging mode has remained a key component of a mobile phone, including feature phones and smartphones.

Even as we are hooked on to instant messaging applications such as WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, Hike or WeChat, not long ago, SMS was everyone's go-to application for one-on-one messaging.

Like Twitter, SMS's 160-character limit also changed the way we communicated with everyone mastering complex abbreviations, known as SMS lingo/language. Remember, IH8U stood for I hate you.

SMS had its own set of emojis as well - for instance typing < 3 meant a heart sign, while ;) meant wink. Some digital platforms still support these keyboard shortcuts for emojis.

Today, for most of the smartphone users, SMS is mainly used for OTP (One Time Passwords), automated alerts say from banks, and in some cases, formal communications. Even as SMS's 25th anniversary gives us nostalgia, let's not forget there are plenty of reasons why SMS became obsolete in the first place.

SMS: Some interesting facts

In 1992, Neil Papworth, a young software programmer, sent the first SMS from his PC to his colleague Richard Jarvis.

Papworth had been working as a developer and test engineer to create a Short Message Service (SMS) for his client, Vodafone. That very first text, sent on December 3, 1992, simply said, 'MERRY CHRISTMAS'.

About one year later, Nokia introduced the world's first SMS feature which came along with a distinctive 'beep' to signal an incoming message.

At first, text messages had a 160-character limit. Early adopters got around this by inventing 'txt spk', such as 'LOL' for 'laughing out loud' and 'emoticons' - symbols made from keyboard characters to show emotions. These would later inspire the creation of emojis. …

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