The Psychological Fabric of Ethical Subjectivity in Woody Allen's Films

By Lăzăroiu, George | Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice, July 1, 2017 | Go to article overview

The Psychological Fabric of Ethical Subjectivity in Woody Allen's Films


Lăzăroiu, George, Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice


1.Introduction

Over the past decade, there has been mounting evidence outlining the language of notions and representations that assists in organizing Allen's comedy, his observations on the character of human existence, his contrasted approach of filmmaking, and his conveying of cultural identities. These findings emphasize the relevance of inspecting Allen's stirring up of the contrast between illusion and reality, the sense of self-reference that replicates and alters all over his films, his cinematic parodies and patterns, and the relevance of his anecdotes and sketches.

2.Allen's Development of the Cinematic Narrative

Several of Allen's films consecrate themselves to elucidating the human inclination for love. Allen's films accomplish their reasons of distraction. Allen does not situate the issue in the complexities of cinematic interaction. The characters in Manhattan cushion themselves against questions of human ultimacy via their concerns with their amorous complications. (Bailey) Allen's public figure has integrated the conflict between durable art and trivial enjoyment. Allen praises the connection of art cinema and Europe and associates American cinema with show business. The opposition art/entertainment is a pivotal trope in Allen's films. Allen mingles brief remarks on prevailing affairs with never-ending metaphysical problems. Allen's cyclical themes, stylistic analogies, and self-reflexivity position him in the sphere of auteur cinema. The summoning of Allen's trustworthy role takes into account a relevance that remains in conflict with the established view of the auteur (Allen's films become newsworthy via his observations on current affairs). The thematic quality arises from the fact that Allen's scripts and screen performances have been impacted by his practice as a stand-up comedian. Allen transfers to his films the satire, oddity, and perspectives he performs on the settings of variety theaters and television. The allusions to relevant subjects construe the characters enacted by Allen as observers conveying their opinions through jokes. The stand-up approach enables the permeation of the film by the extrafilmic. The antagonism low/high art provides comic ingredients for couple mobility in Allen's narratives, representing his personal signature aesthetically. In Stardust the admission to the artist's purposes corresponds to the one to his private life. The blurring between real life and illusion (Androniceanu and Ohanyan, 2016; Carr et al., 2015; Jacquette, 2015; Nica et al., 2016a, b; Popescu, 2016a, b, c; Siegesmund, 2016) develops as the relentless intrusion of the public into the private realm. Stardust modifies the underlying forces between artist and spectators by having the audience place trust in the auteur. (Sayad) Allen inclines to recreate himself, incessantly defying audience requirements, and appeals to a consonant sense of familiarity with the spectators as a result of his genuine oddity that may be illustrated by his nonexistence of star-like attributes. The decline between Allen's onscreen and offscreen character may justify much of his ascendancy. Allen's inadequacies as a comedian have brought about a staggering homogeneity in relation to the characters he enacts. Allen performs essentially the same role even in films different in theme and style. Allen constitutes an unconventional situation of a star figure that harmonizes several incompatible identities. Allen's films generally handle the meaning of famous person and the confusion between the public representation and private individual. Deconstructing Harry brings the question of the vagueness between the real/offscreen Allen and the fictional/onscreen Allen into well-defined point of convergence, resulting in issues regarding the undetermined boundary between Allen's activity and his art. (Glenn)

Allen claims that television is an ordinary device and not an art form, ridiculing television patterns in his films. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Psychological Fabric of Ethical Subjectivity in Woody Allen's Films
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.