Rights of Roma in Romania

By Nicolau, Ingrid | Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice, July 1, 2017 | Go to article overview

Rights of Roma in Romania


Nicolau, Ingrid, Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice


1. Introduction

G. Allport defined prejudice as "a negative attitude or a propensity to display a negative behavior toward a group or its members, based on a wrong and rigid generalization" (Allport, 1996: 76). Prejudices might appear towards members of any social category different from one's own, related to which detrimental feelings exist.

Prejudice is "a way of thinking marked by emotional factors, produced before and outside objective knowledge of the given reality" (DP, 1981: 196). It is: "any uncontrollable statement or generalization regarding human relationships, humans' behavioral manifestation, personal or group qualities of people" (Cf. Ibidem: 201). It is an opinion not verified by the subject, the prejudice being founded on certain thinking clichés, personal or transmitted, from the unfounded generalization of a personal experience (for example, only a part of the Roma's citizens creates troubles, but all of them are regarded equally), from rushed and forced analogies.

While discrimination represents a negative behavior towards the individuals, members of another group, prejudices distinguish the thinking of both individuals and group towards which we display the bias (Chelcea, 2001: 122). As preconceived and uncontrolled ideas and opinions, they easily penetrate the collective mentality, especially in the isolated, traditional societies, where science and culture have a more or less important role. Bad influences of the prejudices have accompanied humankind history from the ancient times up to present.

2. Causes for Roma's Migration from Romania

The social context in Romania after 1990 up to present is defined by four big periods: the period between 1990 and 1995, the one between 1996 and 2000, 2001 and 2006 period and the last, which has begun when Romania became a member state of the European Union.

With the argument of lack of qualification and poor educational trending, which many times proved to be false (Zamfir and Zamfir, 1993: 56-65) regarding the Roma's citizens from Romania, those (together with women) were the first ones excessively fired. In this context, many times, the disgrace given by the unemployed status and the fear of not being employed in the future, given that the former employee was registered as unemployed in the employment record, led to the fact that many of the former Roma employees, who wanted to be hired again, did not go to the working offices to get the rights given by the unemployment law that time (Law no. 1/1990). It was absolutely normal in a state where, just the previous year, unemployed people were liable to imprisonment, precisely the famous Socialist Republic of Romania State Council Decree no. 153/1970, for establishing and sanctioning some offenses regarding the rules of social life, order and public order, abolished by Law no. 61/1991, for sanctioning the violation of rules concerning social life, order and public order. The lack of proper information is one of the main reasons for the Roma's citizens not wanting to call the unemployment law, which represented a premiere in Romania.

Those Roma citizens who took advantage of law no. 1/1990 stipulations referring to the social protection for the unemployed persons but also to ways of professional reintegration, received unemployment benefit for six months, not knowing about the support for professional reintegration.

A feeling of insecurity amongst Roma's citizens was felt, doubled by the poverty, which would become constant for a period of time.

The enforcement of Law no. 67 for social aid (published in Romania's Official Monitor no. 131/1995) brought a small hope amongst Roma's communities. The vast majority of these communities fitted this category, but, after a couple of months from this law's enforcement, some mayors, following the claims according to which the necessary funds for the social aids stipulated by law were insufficient, complained to the prime minister from that time, that the only beneficiaries of this law were Roma's citizens, who refused to work. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Rights of Roma in Romania
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.