Military Museums


Military museums offer fun and engaging ways for students to learn about the work and role of our nation's armed forces. They also promote better understanding of Canada's rich military heritage and the conflicts that have shaped our country. Here's a roundup of some noteworthy places to visit:

Canadian War Museum

Home to one of the world's finest holdings of military artifacts, the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa chronicles Canada's involvement in major world and regional conflicts throughout history. The museum's vast collection comprises more than three million items, ranging from rare vehicles, uniforms, medals, artillery, personal memoirs, works of art, sound and visual recordings. There are a wide range of learning programs for students of all levels, designed to complement school curriculum in the areas of Social Studies, History, and Geography. For more information, visit: www.warmuseum.ca.

The Military Museums

The Military Museums in Calgary, are the largest tri-service museums in Western Canada. Visitors can explore eight distinct museums and galleries, including the Naval, Army and Air Force Museums of Alberta, four regimental museums, and a public art and exhibition space known as the Founder's Gallery. The Military Museums offers a variety of curriculum-based educational programs, activities, and tours to school groups. Special education packages are also available. For more information, please visit: www. themilitarymuseums.ca.

Comox Air Force Museum

Comox Air Force Museum showcases the heritage of the Royal Canadian Air Force's 19 Wing, celebrating the achievements and legacy of West Coast military aviation. Located in the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island, the museum documents the exploits of BC's airmen from the beginnings of Canadian airpower in the First World War until the present day. …

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