Islamophobia in Quebec: An Ideology Rooted in 20th Century Imperialism

By Burrill, Frederick; student, PhD et al. | The Canadian Press, December 11, 2017 | Go to article overview

Islamophobia in Quebec: An Ideology Rooted in 20th Century Imperialism


Burrill, Frederick, student, PhD, History, Department of, University, Concordia, The Canadian Press


Islamophobia in Quebec: An ideology rooted in 20th century imperialism

--

This article was originally published on The Conversation, an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts. Disclosure information is available on the original site.

___

Author: Frederick Burrill, PhD student, Department of History, Concordia University

"Arabs aren't big on sensitivity; they're more egotistical: it's the men first, then the women, and then the children, if anyone thinks of them at all."

This statement sounds like something from the Quebec far-right group

La Meute, or maybe a comment from a certain type of Quebecois "feminist" like journalist Janette Bertrand.

In fact, it's an observation made in 1905 by a young French-Canadian Catholic missionary to Tunisia, taken from the pages of a popular missionary magazine that reached tens of thousands of Quebecers through parishes, schools and family networks across the province.

Quebec's religious amnesia

Here in Quebec, we suffer from what thinker Catherine Foisy has described as "religious amnesia." The mytho-history of the Quiet Revolution continues to structure our discussions on religion and its place in the province; the dominant narrative tells a story of a society that turned away from the church and toward secularity and the welfare state during the years of Jean Lesage's progressive governments in the 1960s.

Unfortunately, this narrative neglects the importance of currents within the church that led to the post-1960 transformation of Quebec.

One of the many phenomena hidden by this forgetfulness is the presence of thousands of French-Canadian missionaries throughout the countries of the Global South during the first half of the 20th century. At the end of the 1950s, more than 3,300 Quebec missionaries were working in 68 countries around the world, including in Asia.

The first foreign missionaries from Quebec included several members of the Catholic African Missionary Society, commonly known as the "White Fathers." This group was founded in France in 1868 after the conquest of Algeria, and was designed to propagate the Christian Gospel to "those poor victims of the impostor [Islam's prophet, Muhammad]," as young French-Canadian missionary Joseph Fillion put it in a 1905 letter.

'Crowning Achievement of Our Small Nation'

In the days before Canada and Quebec developed their own autonomous foreign policies, French-Canadian missionaries were in many ways the most important representatives of our society overseas. Lionel Groulx, a major intellectual architect of contemporary Quebec neo-nationalism, in his 1962 book Le Canada français missionnaire : une autre grande aventure, went so far as to describe foreign mission work as the "crowning achievement of our small nation."

As a result, the history of Quebec before the Quiet Revolution was not one of isolation but rather of transnational connections, anchored in global power structures and inseparable from British and French imperial projects. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Islamophobia in Quebec: An Ideology Rooted in 20th Century Imperialism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.